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在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth -> 
Not the only case
    2011-07-19  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Wang Yuanyuan

    THE Da Vinci Home scandal is not the only case of a Chinese company falsely claiming their domestically made products to be imported.

    The problem is particularly common in the selling of furniture, clothes, nourishment and cosmetic products, said Wang Zhongyu, who devotes much of his free time to consumer rights in Shenzhen.

    One of the most high-profile examples was a milk powder called Ausnutria, which was claimed to be a famous Australian brand imported to China. “But when it planned to list on the Hong Kong stock market, its identity was revealed. It was just a Hunan-based company. Its products cost nearly three times more than similar Chinese brands in supermarkets,” said Wang.

    “However, this phenomenon exists for a reason. Over the past 20 years, Chinese consumers have always thought of foreign products as being a status symbol. Rich people take the lead in buying expensive foreign products and normal people follow. Because of this, Chinese companies have discovered a branding technique that helps them make more money,” said Wu Shi, a professor at the social science department of Shenzhen University.

    Many netizens suggested governments introduce measures to prevent such dishonesty, such as punishments for the offending companies.

    Some also suggested the country build an equal platform for domestic and foreign products, such as allowing them to compete in the market on an equal footing. “In this way, consumers can gradually know that not all foreign products are good and there are some quality Chinese products, too. This would be an effective strategy for Chinese companies’ future development, not just pretending to be a foreign brand,” said a netizen called Liushan001 on microblog.

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