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在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth -> 
Lai accused of massive smuggling
    2011-07-26  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    ASK anyone in China who is old enough to remember the 1990s to list the top 10 economic crimes of the era, and the Yuanhua Group’s smuggling is guaranteed to top the list.

    The notorious case involved more than US$10 billion of smuggling and embroiled dozens of high-ranking government officials. Lai Changxing was the alleged mastermind.

    In the early 1990s, Lai, who was then a farmer in eastern China’s Fujian Province, illegally acquired Hong Kong residency by using fake ID and set up the Yuanhua Group, which later became the center for his alleged multibillion yuan illegitimate business.

    In the mid-1990s, he rented a dock, built a large warehouse and bribed local customs officials to provide cover, prosecutors said.

    In just three years between 1996 and 1999, Lai and his organization allegedly smuggled products worth 53 billion yuan (US$8.22 billion) into China and evaded taxes of more than 30 billion yuan.

    More than 4.5 million tons of oil found its way into the Chinese market in three years and a super oil tanker would arrive at Xiamen, a major harbor city in Fujian Province, every three days. About 20 containers of cigarettes pulled into shore every day and some 8,000 luxury cars entered China over three years and were even publicly put up for sale.

    In 1999, his business was exposed as fraudulent, sending shock-waves across the nation.

    More than 600 people have been found to have taken part in the crimes, including 100 government officials. 14 of them have been sentenced to death.

    Lai managed to escape to Hong Kong and then to Canada, starting his 12-years in exile.(SD-Agencies)

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