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在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth -> 
Issue in foreign media spotlight
    2013-03-12  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Martin Li

    martin.mouse@163.com

    THE issue has also caught the attention of foreign media and expats living in China.

    Reuters published an article titled “Till taxes do us part: Chinese divorce to skip property tax,” which said a district marriage registration office in Shanghai processed 53 divorces in a single day last week, which is about one every five minutes.

    The report also cited State media and said the phenomenon is not new. Couples resorted to forging divorce certificates so they could skirt restrictions and buy more property in 2010 and 2011.

    The New York Times published an article named “In China, a checklist for a home seller: first, get a divorce” on Saturday.

    China’s housing market has been one of the prime engines of economic growth in the past decade, and recently a sharp upturn in prices has reignited fears about inequality and a housing bubble, the report said.

    Ruben Mato Alonso, a Spanish wine trainer in Shenzhen, told Shenzhen Daily on Sunday that the increase in divorce is the result of the policy to defend their legal interests. “The government’s policy cannot achieve the desired goal to cool down the overheating market since fewer people are willing to sell their property, which will ultimately push prices up,” said Alonso.

    Alonso said China’s financial investment market is not mature enough and people have few channels through which to invest. Once the financial market is further opened, people will not put all their money into the housing market.

    “The 20-percent housing property tax is not reasonable in the current Chinese market,” he said.

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