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在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth -> 
10 years later, the pain continues
    2013-03-19  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Ten years ago, the world had to confront the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic, with nearly 8,500 people being infected and nearly 800 killed. In China, the effects of the virus still reverberate to this day. For some people, the year 2003 has become associated with SARS, with some survivors still affected both physically and psychologically by the epidemic, even though it was contained.

    10 years later,  the pain continues

    FANG BO, who survived SARS, recently wrote in his blog about his hopes for a fund to care for former SARS patients. He listed the names of some survivors who are now suffering different diseases.

    “I want to tell you that we as a group are living a difficult life. Most of us suffer leg pains caused by hormone treatments, others have pulmonary fibrosis, cancers, paralysis and some have died,” Fang said in the blog.

    Now in his 70s, Fang was an employee of Haidian Postal Service in Beijing. Fang’s wife and her sister died of SARS and nine of his relatives including his daughter and son-in-law were infected in spring 2003. Though hormone treatments saved his life, Fang has suffered for the past decade from osteonecrosis — a condition that occurs when the blood supply to the bone is disrupted. He had surgery two years ago and will perhaps undergo another operation.

    He has had to struggle to sleep because of nightmares and leg pains caused by hormone treatments 10 years ago.

    For survivors such as Fang, their greatest source of comfort is interacting with other patients who are also dealing with the consequences 10 years after the epidemic.

    “I informed SARS survivors to have medical checks at hospitals, and they all had after-effects. Many of them have not been able to work and had to pay the high medical fees,” said Fang.

    According to a Beijing News report in 2009, Beijing had more than 300 former SARS patients who lived with the consequences of the disease, with 80 percent reportedly having left their jobs and 60 percent suffering from various ailments.

    Fang and other patients started petitions, with the aim of receiving compensation and asking the government to offer some health-care services. But the Ministry of Health only agreed to reimburse the cost for three major consequences of the disease.

    Fang felt that society had turned its back on them. In the years immediately following the epidemic, news about the SARS after-effects was blocked.

    “It is now becoming better, and in 2009 the media started to care about this group of people, but some had already reached a vegetative state or were in the final stages of cancer. So my greatest hope is to establish a fund to help the survivors who are still suffering, and to try to help them in the final stages of their lives. Most of them had a worse situation than me. I was very sad when I saw them,” Fang said. (Han Ximin)

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