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在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth -> 
A welcomed new national policy in China
    2013-05-14  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Wang Yuanyuan

    cheekywang@hotmail.com

    CHINA’S new efforts and progress in organ donations have been welcomed by international society, and the World Health Organization will support the establishment of China’s new organ donation regulations and measures, a WHO official said at Saturday’s forum.

    Jose R. Nunez, a medical officer in the WHO’s transplant-patient safety program, made the remarks and said measures implemented in China in the last few years are clearly moving in the direction encouraged by the WHO. The legislative and organizational measures are needed to open a new era for organ donation and transplants based on transparency, public confidence and support, Nunez said.

    China implemented organ transplant regulations in 2007.

    “Since 2007, we can see that China has worked very hard to promote organ donation, which is very encouraging,” he said.

    Transplantation is not just a matter of technical or scientific expertise, he said, it is also a matter of cultural, societal and, in many cases, traditional concerns.

    “A clear example of this is the development of a unique and innovative approach to organ donation with a new classification of ‘deceased donor,’ including China category III, which means donation after brain death followed by cardiac death,” Nunez said. “This category is clearly respectful of the current cultural and societal reality in China. It will help China’s program of organ donation after death to debut and grow.”

    Nunez hopes that China’s explorations in organ donation can set a good example for the development of transplant systems in the Asian region.

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