-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Photo Highlights -> 
Wedding customs displayed
    2013-09-26  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    WEDDING customs, like other elements of Chinese culture, have strong regional and historical influences. At a wedding expo in May at Shenzhen Convention and Exhibition Center in Futian District, Shenzhen Daily photographer Sun Yuchen captured some of those influences by taking numerous photos of clay sculptures that reproduced scenes from folk weddings in different parts of China and different historical periods. The sculptures were displayed as part of the expo.

(Anna Zhao, Sun Yuchen)

A clay sculpture by Chen Jun, Cheng Feng and Liu Cungui shows wedding customs in Shaanxi Province. The groom goes to the bride’s home to escort her to the wedding, along with a musical band that plays for the entire trip on the joyous occasion.

A clay sculpture by Xu Pingsheng and Zhuang Zizhang shows a Hakka wedding in Guangdong Province.

A visitor photographs a clay sculpture depicting a wedding scene in Shaanxi Province.

Clay sculptures by Xu Pingsheng and Zhuang Zizhang show a wedding ceremony during the Cultural Revolution (L) and a Mosuo ethnic group wedding (R). The Mosuo people pursue loved ones by singing folk songs, lighting bonfires and dancing.

A clay sculpture by Su Yiping shows that some places in Central China follow a tradition that a bride should walk over a small fire before stepping into her husband’s home for a wedding ceremony, in a ritual meant to keep away bad luck and usher in purity and good fortune.

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn