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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Travel -> 
Temples in Fu’an
    2013-09-30  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    James Baquet

    jamesbaquet@gmail.com

    AFTER remote Huayan Temple on Zhiti Mountain, my friend Venerable Deru wanted to take me to several other temples in northern Fujian Province, especially in his town of Fu’an. According to the monk, this town of 600,000 (200,000 in the city center) has over 300 Buddhist temples. Many, however, are no more than a single small hall.

    Our first stop was at a small, quiet retreat at the bottom of Zhiti Mountain, still in Ningde. Shuiyun (Water Cloud) Temple is set in the foothills against waves of bamboo forest. His friend (the abbot) wasn’t in, so we quickly headed north to Zhongde (Planting Virtue) Temple, which Venerable Deru says is the largest in Fu’an, and the site of a Buddhist college.

    We then visited Qiyun (Settle Cloud) Temple, where Venerable Deru lives. He said the temple was founded in the Tang Dynasty (618-907), more than 1,000 years ago. Yet it was only 10 years old. How is this possible? He explained that a monk or a group of devotees must find a founding document, and then obtain proof that a temple had been located in a particular place, through records, archeological evidence, or the testimony of residents. He may then petition the government to rebuild a former foundation. Voila! The lost is found, the old becomes new.

    We went on to Fu’an’s Tianma Mountain (Heaven Horse Mountain), site of several temples. We saw a most unusual design at Tiantang (Heaven Hall) Temple, then ended up at Xiangshan (Fragrant Mountain) Temple, where the nuns cook an excellent dinner. After tea with the delightful young abbess, Venerable Yixiang and Venerable Deru took me to the train back to Fuzhou.

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