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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Travel -> 
Beishan Grottoes, Dazu
    2014-03-24  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    James Baquet

    jamesbaquet@gmail.com

    AFTER the somewhat cartoonish figures at Baodingshan, I found the elegance of the next set of grottoes refreshing.

    Beishan ( North Mountain) is just a couple of kilometers from the center of Dazu. It’s so close, I took a taxi, which by happy accident dropped me at the wrong part of the complex where I saw a pagoda, a couple of good-sized carved Buddhas, and a funky little Three Buddha Hall with a single old monk sleeping inside.

    A UNESCO-worthy site, the statues here have a delicate reality that rivals the best I’ve seen anywhere in China. Large groupings predominate: Shakyamuni, the founding Buddha, surrounded by bodhisattvas, disciples, and angel-like apsaras; thirteen separate manifestations of the Bodhisattva of Compassion, Guanyin, all in one niche; and Amitabha Buddha presiding over a fortress-like Western Pure Land, surrounded by souls who have been reborn there.

    These are just some of the assemblages. In addition there are individual bodhisattvas, and whole walls of mini-buddhas. There is almost nothing whimsical in this site; the tone is primarily reverent.

    Some of Beishan’s carvings are Dazu’s oldest, started in 892 by Wei Junjing, a military governor sent to the area to quell a rebellion. An extensive stele carved in the wall next to a statue of Wei tells of his accomplishments. The more elaborate and extensive carvings in a 500-meter-long overhang are later, 12th-century, additions.

    Like the larger and flashier Baodingshan, this is a sight not to be missed.

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