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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
Indoor plants you can’t kill
    2014-04-04  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    For everyone out there missing the green thumb gene, there are still some plants that can thrive in your home.

    SNAKE PLANT

    “Snake plant, also known as mother-in-law’s tongue, can literally survive in a closet — that’s how little light it needs,” said Juliette Vass, owner of online plant stores My City Plants and Orchid Diva. The leaves’ deep green centers and light yellow edges go a long way toward livening up an otherwise plain room.

    ZZ PLANT

    This low-height, leafy plant is perfect for filling up an empty corner in your family room. “ZZ plants need low to medium light and require little attention,” said Vass. A pot, a window, and a little water here and there are all this guy needs.

    CHAMOMILE

    “Chamomile flowers resemble little suns,” said Pellegrini. “You can snip off a few buds at a time for your tea.” These delicate-looking flowers do require a bit more sunlight, so stick them by a window and you’re good to go.

    RAINBOW SWISS CHARD

    Swiss chard is not only edible, but also extremely healthy. Plus, the stocks bring natural color to an otherwise drab windowsill. “Swiss chard grows upward, so it doesn’t need a lot of space to spread out, making it perfect for a contained space like a pot or planter box,” said Pellegrini.

    VIOLAS

    Violas aren’t just purple — their tiny flower petals grow in a variety of colors. “Violas do well indoors because they don’t need intense sunlight and actually like shade,” said Pellegrini. Set them near a window, and they’ll get the amount of natural light they need to thrive.

    (SD-Agencies)

    FLOWERING THYME

    Who doesn’t get an awesome sense of accomplishment from picking their own herbs? According to “Modern Pioneering” author Georgia Pellegrini, thyme, with its small flower blossoms, is a great option. “Thyme grows well in pots, even upcycled coffee tins, which can be perched on a kitchen windowsill,” said Pellegrini. “That way, it’s at your fingertips while cooking.”

    PHALAENOPSIS ORCHID

    “Believe it or not, these orchids don’t mind being neglected a little,” said Vass, making them perfect for some extra ambiance in the entryway without any extra maintenance. The fragrant beauties can bloom for up to three months at a time.

    GARLIC

    You can definitely handle growing garlic, which has surprisingly beautiful blossoms. And their strong smell isn’t released until they’re sliced or pressed, so don’t worry about stinking up your house. “When planted indoors, where there’s less humidity, garlic grows well in pots year-round,” said Pellegrini. “You can use cloves from a head of garlic and allow them to sprout, then plant them in a pot in direct sunlight.”

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