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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
OLD FASHION IS TRENDY!
    2014-04-18  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Tan Yifan

    cicitan2011@gmail.com

    DEFINING what is “mainstream” or “trendy” today is definitely a difficult job. While some fashion designers try to add surreal elements or apply cutting-edge techniques to their sketches, fabrics or clippings, many young people are busy digging through their parents’ and grandparents’ closets looking for lost vintage gems such as cards, a piece of furniture, scarves, clothes, jewelry, hats, bags or a random piece of cloth that were once fashionable, but then were forgotten.

    Vintage, a word constantly used by young people, refers to a fashion style that includes pieces that were produced and worn decades ago that were the “must-have” items of their day.

    “It can be very hard to draw a set boundary of what is or isn’t vintage fashion,” a girl preferring to be called Rabbit Nancy told Shenzhen Daily. “The taste for vintage actually differs from person to person. Take me for an example, I love to collect the items that were once owned by other people,” she said. “They are unique and carry stories of specific people and certain times.”

    Nancy bragged about a vintage party she and her friends held at the end of March in Futian District. She said their party attracted around 150 local party-goers.

    Greeting cards, beer cups, photos, furniture and speeches were brought to the event, encouraging the organizers to embark on new projects related to the theme and to draw more people to the trend.

    Nancy said another vintage party will be held May 18 at OCT-LOFT as more people want to join the group. She said besides the party they share ideas through her WeChat group (ID: rabbitNancy).

    “Many products bear the essence of vintage,” Nancy said. “All you have to remember is to pay attention to products’ quality. It’s ok if you cannot afford a real antique, but if you don a cheap, shoddy replica, your style can hardly be defined as trendy. Vintage is for those who want to be independent and special. It’s easy for these buyers to be attracted by vintage stuff, but to dress in good taste requires some knowledge about the fashion,” she added.

    Western or Oriental

    Fashion today is narrowing the gaps between places and cultures. As more Chinese designers and fashion icons are invited to important fashion shows in other countries, mainly in Western Europe, tailors in Luohu District work day and night to produce copycat garments just released on the other side of the world a few hours ago. Chinese buyers then warmly embrace those clothes; soon, everyone joins in and enjoys these global trends.

    However, 50 or more years ago, Chinese people dressed entirely differently from their Western peers. From fabric to style, the dresses and ornaments displayed just how separate the cultures were.

    Thus, a beginner should educate herself before shopping for retro stuff.

    “If you like Asian culture, you might wear a cheongsam, Chinese tunic suit or university student’s dress from around the 1930s,” Nancy said. “But if you decide to follow Western fashion, you shouldn’t wear a Chinese army cap that was hot among Chinese people between the 1940s and 1980s. You could wear a geisha hairstyle with a high bun, but if you match it with a pair of Chinese army shoes, that will be a huge mistake.”

    Time matters

    Besides the differences in regions and cultures, time periods could limit your selection in certain ways.

    “Time is very important in vintage fashion,” Nancy said. “Most of us agree that vintage fashions are no older than World War I, though some people are crazy about baroque, rococo or Chinese Han or Tang fashion style. However, those styles are not ‘vintage,’” she explained.

    While clothes collected by vintage fashionistas are mostly wearable, items from generations living hundreds of years ago can only be displayed. Therefore, knowing the time of the items will help a beginner to avoid embarrassment.

    “You can wear antique necklaces or rings, but for clothes, you need to stick to more recent time periods. If you dress like Queen Victoria or Empress Wu Zetian in the Tang Dynasty to your workplace, people will think you’re nuts and post your photo online,” she said.

    Mixed style with

    heavy makeup

    As most of the vintage clothes are from at least 30 years ago, it can be hard to dress head to toe within the same time period. Also, some pieces may have lost their brilliant colors. The best way to highlight the items is to adopt a mixed style ィC match vintage pieces with current fashionable items.

    “You can pair a neat white blouse with a long black retro dress or a vintage print skirt,” Nancy suggested.

    Or, men can wear suspender trousers they bought at a vintage shop with a modern T-shirt they prefer.

    To be even more eye-catching, women can apply heavy makeup to enhance their dramatic outlook.

    “For example, you can wear thick eyeliner and apply dark red lipstick,” Nancy said.

    Also, you can imitate the makeup style of a time period you prefer.

    Be a smart shopper

    Some vintage items are replicas, but some are authentic with high value. Beginners are advised to purchase brand-name products or get the help of an expert.

    “Prices of items can vary from hundreds to thousands of yuan,” Nancy said. “You may not have heard of most of the designers.” The market is still immature in Shenzhen, so you may come across knock-offs or overpriced products.

    As there are hardly any vintage shops in town, many buyers shop online or go to familiar private collectors.

    Many buyers are unwilling to bargain if they come upon an item they really like, Nancy said. Some simply do not care about the price; others will never know just how much they overpaid for that 1930s cheongsam.

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