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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
The difference between depression and sadness
    2014-08-15  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    ACTOR and comedian Robin Williams was found dead Monday afternoon at his home near Tiburon, California. He had been battling severe depression of late. At 63, he committed suicide by hanging.

    Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. The problem is also serious in big cities in China.

    But despite how common the illness is, many people do not understand exactly what it means to have depression, and often think of it as being the same as sadness.

    “‘Depression’ is one of the most tragically misunderstood words in the English language,” wrote Stephen Ilardi, an associate professor of clinical psychology at the University of Kansas, in a blog post on the Psychology Today website. “When people refer to depression in everyday conversation, they usually have something far less serious in mind, than what the disorder actually entails. In fact, the term typically serves as a synonym for mere sadness.”

    But people should watch out for symptoms of the disorder and seek help as early as possible. Here are some facts about depression:

    Although major depression can strike people of any age, the median age at onset is 32.5, according to Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

    Depression is more common in women than in men, according to Washington University.

    Men with depression are more likely than depressed women to abuse alcohol and other substances, according to Jill Goldstein, director of research at the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Depressed men may also try to mask their sadness by turning to other outlets, such as watching TV, playing sports and working excessively, or engaging in risky behaviors, Goldstein said earlier this year.

    Men’s symptoms of depression may be harder for other people to recognize, and the illness is missed more frequently in men, Goldstein said.

    Men with depression are more likely than women with the condition to commit suicide, Goldstein said. Men with depression may go longer without being diagnosed or treated, and so men may develop a more devastating mental health problem.

    Symptoms of depression extend far beyond feeling sad, and may include: loss of interest and pleasure in normal activities, irritability, agitation or restlessness, lower sex drive, decreased concentration, insomnia or excessive sleeping and chronic fatigue and lethargy, according to Mayo Clinic.

    (SD-Agencies)

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