-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Movies -> 
Pompeii
    2014-08-22  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Voices: Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Jared Harris, Adewale Akkinnuoye-Agbaje Director: Paul W.S. Anderson

    Director Paul W.S. Anderson (“Resident Evil”) tackles history’s most infamous volcanic disaster which took place in 79 when Mount Vesuvius violently erupted, in an action-romance starring Kit Harington (“Game of Thrones”) and Emily Browning (“Sucker Punch”).

    THE lava flows by the ton, as does the cheese, in “Pompeii,” a kitschy apocalyptic peplum whose visual epiphanies, of which there are definitely a few scenarios, will have lots of eyes rolling by the time the big stack finally blows.

    A flashback features a young Celtic boy watching his parents slaughtered at the hands of the ruthless Corvus (Kiefer Sutherland) and his top soldier Proculus (Sasha Roiz).

    Seventeen years later, that boy has grown up to become a strapping gladiator known as “The Celt” but named Milo (Kit Harington), and is soon shipped off to the southern city of Pompeii to serve as violent entertainment for the blood-hungry plebeians.

    On the way, he makes a major impression on Cassia (Emily Browning), the waifish daughter of town chief Severus (Jared Harris) and wife Aurelia (Carrie-Anne Moss), who’s heading back home after spending a rather turbulent year in Rome, which her parents make sound like some sort of decadent party school. Also arriving is Corvus, now a senator for Emperor Titus and in charge of deciding whether the capital will invest in Pompeii’s much-needed urban improvements.

    With all the characters — including a fellow slave fighter, Atticus (Adewale Akkinnuoye-Agbaje), whom Milo befriends in gladiator prison — converging on the coastal burb just as Vesuvius starts making its first rumbles, it’s clear by the second reel where things are headed, and the script never once deters from a routine plot that plays like it’s literally been written in stone. This especially holds true for the burgeoning romance between Milo and Cassia.

    Since the backstory plays out as mere filler, one can only wait for the volcano to erupt, but Anderson delays the big moment for at least an hour. Just beforehand, he delivers one of his better set pieces, with Milo and Atticus fending off an entire Roman battalion as the city cheers on at the local arena, the two muscle-bound warriors cutting their way through many a throat.

    Once Vesuvius blows, it’s off to the races, with slaves and citizens alike dashing for the seas as megabombs of fire, rock and lava tear the town to pieces, leaving little hope for escape and wasting more marble than a Beverly Hills bathtub. These moments are clearly where Anderson thrives, cutting between distant bird’s-eye views of the devastation below and action-packed snippets where DP Glen MacPherson and VFX supervisor Dennis Berardi shoot tons of smoke and ash right into our faces.

    As if that weren’t enough, there are also several deadly sword fights, horse chases and one killer tsunami that sends all the corpses and rubble back in the other direction. It’s apocalypse overdose for sure, but like most CG mass destructions, sometimes beautiful to behold, even if the pounding sound design (by Stephen Barden) and score (by Clinton Shorter) hardly give us space to sit back and admire the scenery.

    Unfortunately, the love story soon comes back around to spoil all the fun, and while Anderson excels in the film’s many moments of digital doom-and-gloom, he can’t deliver a single authentic emotion between the two star-crossed leads, leaving us with a sooty aftertaste of having sat through one very loud rendition of Titanic in togas.

    Tech credits are top-notch, with sets by production designer Paul Denham Austerberry doing a great job laying out Pompeii’s elaborate urban plan. 3-D is actually a plus here, especially when the mayhem begins.

    The movie is now being screened in Shenzhen.

    (SD-Agencies)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn