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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
PLANNING THE PERFECT THANKSGIVING DINNER
    2014-11-07  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Each year on the fourth Thursday in November, Americans gather for a day of feasting, football and family. While today’s Thanksgiving celebrations would likely be unrecognizable to attendees of the original 1621 harvest meal, it continues to be a day for Americans to come together around the table — albeit with some updates to the pilgrims’ menu.Amanda Roberts

    aroberts42@live.com

    FOOD. It’s pretty much the main topic of conversation among expats and never more so than around Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving is one of the worst times to be away from home, so many Americans do their best to recreate a traditional Thanksgiving dinner for their new friends and family overseas. But cooking while living in a foreign country poses many challenges. Here are some tips and tricks for planning the perfect Thanksgiving dinner while living abroad.

    Utensils

    Cooking Thanksgiving dinner requires some special kitchen utensils. You at least need a roasting pan. A baster is also good, as is aluminum foil. You will want to make sure you have enough serving plates, bakeware, flatware and a carving knife. The recipes will also require some special seasonings you probably don’t have in your spice rack. Sit down ahead of time and make a menu, a guest list and then a shopping list. Shop early. The import stores in Sea World have everything you need, but only a limited supply. Don’t wait until the last minute!

    The turkey

    The turkey is the most important part of Thanksgiving dinner. It really isn’t Thanksgiving without a turkey. However, turkeys are a new world animal and, unlike other new world foods, has not grown in popularity in China. If you live in a large metropolitan area, they are getting easier to find. Metro supermarket usually has a few in stock, but not many. It is a good idea to get your turkey at least a week early before they run out. Of course, then you have the problem of storing it until you are ready to thaw it, which can be difficult if you have a small freezer, so plan accordingly.

    If you can’t get a turkey, roasted duck or goose is an acceptable substitute.

    If you are planning on roasting a turkey, though, be cautious of the size of your turkey. In America, we tend to choose our turkey based on pounds because we all have large enough ovens to handle almost any turkey. But in China, if you have an oven, most likely it is an oversized toaster oven, which still isn’t very big. Hot tip — pick your turkey based on inches instead of pounds! Measure the inside of your oven. Then, measure the turkeys at the store and pick one that fits in your oven.

    Cooking

    Your turkey will need to thaw for several hours. Place your turkey in a sink full of cold water. Change the water every 30 minutes. It will need to thaw for 30 minutes for every pound.

    Preheat the oven to 175 degrees Celsius.

    Remove the turkey from the packaging. Reach into the turkey’s cavity and remove the giblet pack. Hot tip — unlike American turkeys, Chinese turkeys also have their heads in the cavity, so just be prepared because it can be a shock the first time you pull one out.

    Pat the turkey dry and place it breast side up in the roasting pan. Brush the turkey with a light layer of butter, oil, or mayonnaise. You can also season the turkey with garlic powder, onion powder, rosemary, thyme, Italian seasonings or whatever you like. Place the turkey in the oven, but make sure you can see the pop-out thermometer.

    Your turkey will take 3-4 hours to cook, depending on the size. At about the two-hour mark, the turkey’s juices should start escaping and it should start browning on the top. Place a sheet of aluminum foil over the turkey to keep it from browning too quickly. You can also start basting the turkey about every 30 minutes to redistribute the juices.

    When the thermometer pops, your turkey is done. Remove it from the oven and let it set for 30 minutes, basting occasionally. Reserve the juices for the stuffing and the gravy.

    Stuffing

    The perfect partner for turkey is stuffing. In a major metropolitan area, boxed stuffing is pretty easy to find. But if you live where it is hard to find or if the import stores run out, don’t worry; you can still make it from scratch.

    Place 4 cups of bread into the refrigerator overnight to dry out. After the bread is dry, chop into 2.5-cm cubes.

    In a skillet or wok, heat up 2 tablespoons of oil or butter. Add in 1 cup of diced celery and 1 cup of diced onions and sautee until they are slightly softened but still have some crunch. Add in 1 cup of turkey broth (if you don’t have enough, you can add in 1 cup of chicken broth or 1 cup of water and 1 tablespoon of chicken bouillon). Stir until hot. Add in seasonings such as dried or fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme, sage), salt and pepper to taste. Remove from heat and gently fold in breadcrumbs. The bread should be moist, but not soggy. You can add in more liquid as needed.

    Transfer mixture to a baking dish and bake at 190 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes.

    Gravy

    You have to top your turkey and stuffing with a river of gravy. If you want, you can mince and fry up the turkey giblets and add them to the gravy.

    In a skillet or wok, heat up 1/4 cup of butter or oil. Whisk in 1/4 cup flour to form a roux. Let this cook for a minute to brown, but don’t let it burn. Slowly mix in 1-2 cups of turkey juices, depending on how thin you want your gravy, whisking as you go. You can also use chicken broth if you don’t have enough turkey juices. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    Other side dishes

    These three recipes are just to get you started, but your meal can also include mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, biscuits, and much more. Cooking this world-famous dinner from scratch while living abroad certainly poses challenges, but by being flexible and planning ahead, you can look forward to that little taste of home in your adopted country this month.

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