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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Opinion -> 
The U.S. plays China Threat again?
    2014-11-24  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Xu Qinduo

    xuqinduo@gmail.com

    “CHINA and ‘one or two’ other countries have the ability to launch a cyberattack that could shut down the entire U.S. power grid and other critical infrastructures,” said a U.S. official, according to a Newsweek report.

    The remarks were made Thursday by Admiral Michael Rogers, the head of the U.S. National Security Agency (yes, that infamous cyber spy agency the NSA) during a congressional hearing.

    It is no secret that politicians and bureaucratic officials in Washington often conveniently play the China Threat card in order to gain more financing or even profit from certain projects. China has been the biggest boogeyman to shoot at for decades. Remember the laughable statement by Senator Harry Reid that the U.S. Olympic Committee should burn the American team’s China-made uniforms before the London Olympics in 2012? The clothing was produced in China but was designed by Ralph Lauren, a U.S. apparel company. Reid, together with his Republican colleagues, made fools of themselves by revealing the shallowness of U.S. politicians in their attempt to drum up public support for elections at the expense of the China-U.S. relationship.

    In a similar vein, NSA Director Rogers told the congressional panel that “It is only a matter of when, not if, we are going to see something traumatic.” Yes, nobody can dispute that — something traumatic will happen in the next 10, 20 or 50 years. He was speaking pretty much the truth, except that there is no reason to believe China will be the source of these future terrors.

    Most likely, the U.S. is conducting similar tests to find vulnerabilities in other countries, including China. According to a 2013 report, there’s an agency in the U.S. intelligence community by the name of the Office of Tailored Access Operations (TAO). TAO has been “breaking into China’s computers and telecommunications systems for 15 years.”

    The U.S. is one of the few countries that not only has the ability to launch a cyberattack, but also has already done so. The U.S. and Israel successfully paralyzed the computer system for Iran’s nuclear research in 2010 by planting a virus by the name of Stuxnet.

    But when it comes to China and the U.S., why would China launch an attack on America’s infrastructure when Chinese investments are booming in the U.S.? There are Chinese-run hotels, power plants, companies, banking services and a growing number of Chinese students studying in the U.S. What benefit would there be for China in assaulting U.S. infrastructure that would not also damage our own interests?

    The latest China Threat talk came out at the heels of a very fruitful and constructive summit meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and his U.S. counterpart Barack Obama in Beijing. By reaching deals in climate change, IT trade and an agreement to reduce military tension, the two leaders successfully brought the world’s most important relationship back on track after years of problems.

    Cybersecurity is an important part of China-U.S. cooperation. The U.S. blatantly steals information from other countries, including its allies, and listened to the personal phone calls of leaders in Brazil, Germany and Indonesia. Unless they confront their own rampant, lawless behaviors, their accusation of other countries involved in cyber espionage is not credible.

    (The author is a current affairs commentator with China Radio International.)

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