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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Opinion -> 
Every trade has masters
    2014-12-01  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Wu Guangqiang

    jw368@163.com

    TO most Chinese students and their parents, success has a narrow definition: entering a national or world preeminent university, landing a high-paying job after graduation, and enjoying a comfortable life from then on. Anyone who attempts to deviate from this path to success is regarded as an “idler” or a “wacko.”

    But Zhou Hao, a 24-year-old student from the Beijing Industrial Technician Academy (BITA), has his own ideas about success.

    In 2008, he was admitted with flying colors to the School of Life Science of Peking University, but that admirable success tortured him for two years because it was not his choice, but his parents’ and teachers’. So he made a “crazy” decision three years ago to transfer from Peking University (PU), a dream school for millions of students, to BITA.

    Ever since his childhood, Zhou has taken great pleasure in working with his hands. He dismantled and reassembled almost every appliance in his house. His ideal school was Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, which could have satisfied his desire “to work with his hands,” but he yielded to the pressure of his elders and attended PU.

    However, like a fish out of water, he couldn’t deal with tedious theory courses, and in the winter of 2011, he changed the course of his life by transferring to BITA.

    Zhou quickly became one of the best students at BITA. Many enterprises have offered him high-paying jobs, but he prefers to learn as much about digital control technology as possible rather than accept any offers now.

    Zhou’s inspiring story’s message is clear — there is no formula for success. As the Chinese saying goes, “Hang hang chu zhuang yuan,” or “Every trade has its masters.” In the Internet age, dreams, passion and fearless attempts are the most valuable assets for the young. Our society and system should be adjusted to allow young people to fully explore their creativity and originality.

    Young people’s imaginations and abilities are far more powerful than adults can understand.

    Yu Jiawen, 23, a student at Guangzhou University, is the founder and CEO of MyFriday, a smartphone app that is extremely popular with university students. The app enables students to search for curriculum information at over 1,000 institutions of higher learning around China. Like-minded students use it to share information about courses, notes, study materials and to promote friendship.

    Since its launch in 2011, MyFriday has won the hearts of millions of college students and has caught the attention of venture-capital investors and IT giants. According to Yu, his company just received an US$80 million investment from Alibaba. Another Steve Jobs or Jack Ma may be in the making.

    Yu’s success has revealed a simple recipe for success — scout for practical needs and demands, put plans into action, and turn demands into products and services.

    

    The good news is that an increasing number of young people are brushing away the outdated concept of success and are pursuing their own dreams. Hu Zhenyu is one of them.

    The 21-year-old man is the founder and CEO of Shenzhen-based Link Space Technology, Inc., China’s first private aerospace company. On July 29, Hu and his team successfully launched a sounding rocket named KCSA-TOP at a launching site in Inner Mongolia.

    After their initial success, Hu’s company has signed contracts with Chinese research institutions. Link Space could be another Space X, a private American company that has launched a number of spacecraft.

    The bravery and perseverance of these young people have paid off! But there are still millions of students whose imagination and creativity is restrained by an examination-oriented education system.

    It’s time to further reform Chinese education so it can unleash the vitality and originality of China’s youths.

    (The author is an English tutor and freelance writer.)

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Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn