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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Travel -> 
Shangfeng Temple, Nanyue, Hunan
    2014-12-01  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    James Baquet

    jamesbaquet@gmail.com

    MY next destination was the charming town of Nanyue in Hunan, at the foot of Hengshan Mountain. This is one of the “Five Great Mountains of China,” along with another Hengshan Mountain (different Chinese character) in Shanxi in the north; Taishan Mountain (east); Huashan Mountain (west); and Songshan Mountain (center). Because of its position in the south, Hengshan Mountain is called “Nanyue,” as is the town. (Last week’s temple on Yuelu Mountain lies at the north end of the same range.)

    The town of Nanyue boasts the largest complex of ancient buildings in Hunan, and the largest temple in southern China. The Grand Temple of Hengshan Mountain (Nanyue Damiao) was built in 725, but this was not my destination.

    Paying 100 yuan (US$16) to enter the Hengshan Mountain Scenic Spot, and 70 yuan more for the shuttle bus up the mountain, I was disappointed to find that — though a road runs past the first target of the day — the bus stopped partway up and with hordes of other pilgrims I had to walk the steep remaining 2.5 kilometers to Shangfeng (Upper Peak) Temple.

    Unfortunately, not only was the temple crowded, but it was also under heavy reconstruction. The statues were of negligible interest, and the monks were too busy with tourists to offer much in the way of hospitality.

    The prime benefit derived from all that work (besides the exercise)? The view! This place is spectacular, truly rugged, and (almost) worth the long climb up a paved road to reach it. But I couldn’t linger to appreciate the view for long. I had two more temples to visit that day, unless I wanted to pay the same price the next day to return!

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