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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Opinion -> 
Chinese wisdom in diplomacy
    2014-12-08  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Wu Guangqiang

    jw368@163.com

    PRESIDENT Xi Jinping returned to Beijing on Nov. 23 after his state visits to Australia, New Zealand and Fiji. During the 10-day tour, Xi visited 10 cities, met and talked with nearly 40 leaders from various countries and international organizations across the world and attended over 80 bilateral and multilateral events, including the G20 summit in Brisbane, Australia. His latest visits, like his previously intensive diplomatic activities since he took office in 2012, were constructive and fruitful. Before this trip, Xi made 10 overseas visits to nearly 30 countries and regions in the last one and a half years.

    As China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi put it, Xi successfully got it across that China is a peace-loving country, China’s development is an opportunity for the world and that the Chinese Dream is compatible with the Asian-Pacific Dream.

    Running through Xi’s frequent diplomatic maneuvers are his new diplomacy ideas: sincerity, mutual benefits and inclusiveness, all of which have been employed in dealing with China’s neighboring countries and regions. On China’s relationship with the U.S., Xi has been advocating a new pattern of relationships between great powers, which are characterized by the principles of “no conflict, no confrontation, mutual respect and achieving a win-win situation through cooperation.”

    Many global observers have perceived the potentially profound impact China’s new foreign policy will have on the world’s future. China is tackling thorny issues of global governance and dealing with international relations with Chinese wisdom by offering Chinese solutions.

    With the rise of China, amid welcoming applause, there has been some apprehension, suspicion, demonization and precaution. Chinese leaders have been going to great length to convince the rest of the world that 5,000 years of Chinese history doesn’t have the “gene” of hegemony and belligerence. In Xi’s words, despite being a “big guy,” China has firm convictions of peace, harmony and mutual benefits and believes that a warlike nation will go to ruin, however powerful it is.

    However, it is understandable that some countries look at China, the fast-growing “big guy,” with suspicion, since modern world history has been one governed by the law of the jungle: new powers replacing old ones by military and economic dominance. In Western political dictionaries, phrases defining international relations include rivalry, zero-sum game, ally, sanction, and military strike, all of which can be simplified as “carrots and sticks.”

    Will China be a benign dragon?

    A browse through compendiums of ancient Chinese sages’ thoughts can help people trace the cultural roots of China’s peaceful foreign policy today.

    The quintessence of Confucianism includes ren (humanity) and li (courtesy or etiquette); both concepts promote peace and mutual respect.

    Taoism stresses more on harmony, including inter-people harmony and human-nature harmony. Some quotes of Lao Tzu, the founder of Taoism, are still relevant today: “He who controls others may be powerful, but he who has mastered himself is mightier still.” “The sage does not hoard; the more he helps others, the more he benefits himself.” “The way of the sage is to act but not to compete.”

    

    What China is striving to do today is exactly the embodiment of our ancestors’ teachings. “One Belt and One Road” or the “Silk Road Economic Belt” and the “21st Century Maritime Silk Road,” BRICS Development Bank, Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, China and China-ASEAN Investment Cooperation Fund, and international and inter-regional interconnectivity, all these Chinese initiatives have the same objectives — mutual development and shared prosperity.

    China’s own experience has proved that only by pursuing lasting development can poverty be uprooted; only by eradicating poverty can stability be achieved; and only by bringing about joint development in the world can the earth become a safer place.

    Jack Ma, founder and chairperson of Alibaba, can’t agree more with the idea. When asked recently by a Western journalist on who is his competitor or enemy, he said, “I am not running Alibaba to compete with someone, much less to defeat someone. I just want to help millions of ordinary people to feed themselves and make their dreams come true.”

    Ma may be one of the best narrators and examples of Chinese wisdom. His influence and success overseas may indicate, to some degree, the success of China’s peaceful foreign policy.

    (The author is an English tutor and freelance writer.)

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