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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Opinion -> 
Aniseed for chicken is no little thing
    2014-12-08  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Jiang Tanjun

    jtjbarry@163.com

    RECENTLY, a dissertation entitled “The Influence and Functional Mechanism of Aniseed to the Flavor of Braised Chicken (八角茴香对卤鸡肉挥发性风味的影响及其作用机制),” by Sun Lingxia, a candidate for a doctoral degree at Shaanxi Normal University, caused a hot controversy among netizens.

    Critics say research at such a level should focus on “big things” instead of “trivial” things such as a condiment for a dish.

    However, even the detractors must realize that no Chinese restaurant has been as successful as McDonald’s or KFC, even though China is famous for its cuisine around the world. So, the question must be asked: why can no Chinese restaurant become a world-class food chain? A very important reason is that the processing of Chinese food has never been standardized.

    Standardization usually means optimized and stabilized quality. For one kind of Chinese dish, different chefs produce different tastes or flavors. But the processing of food in McDonald’s or KFC is standardized in every detail. For instance, the temperature of soda is maintained at 4 to 6 degrees Celsius because research found this temperature range ensures the best flavor. McDonald’s even set up a Hamburger University many years ago in Chicago to offering minute courses in standardized food processing.

    If McDonald’s can have a hamburger university, why can we not have a doctoral degree holder specializing in food flavor? It is no exaggeration that the research by Sun is useful in Chinese food processing standardization that could help Chinese restaurants become even more popular around the world.

    In China, plagiarism, data fraud and clichés are endemic problems in university dissertations.

    After two years of research, countless drumsticks braised with aniseed tasted, sensory evaluations performed and electronic testers applied, Sun finally came up with an 80,000-word dissertation. Sun’s efforts deserve praise rather than ridicule. If every researcher could implement scientific research as Sun did, I believe that the level of Chinese dissertations will improve greatly.

    I acknowledge that public resources should be used efficiently for scientific research, but so many people preferring “big things” to “trivial” matters reflects a flippant attitude toward scientific research. “Big things” without doubt are important, but a big issue usually is solved by successfully dealing with numerous little things.

    (The author is a senior management consultant.)

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