-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> In depth -> 
Three countries account for 90% of Chinese beef imports
    2014-12-09  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    IN the first nine months of this year, beef imports into China increased by 14 percent, compared with the same period in 2013, to 238,800 tons, according to EBLEX, the organization for beef and lamb levy payers in England.

    EBLEX says growing demand for beef imports is a direct consequence of declining domestic output in China at a time when demand for a protein-rich diet is increasing. China’s domestic beef industry is facing several challenges, including breeding, productivity, farm management and feed resources. With such limitations to beef production in China, the country depends heavily on imports.

    China imports beef from three key markets, Australia, Uruguay and New Zealand. Together, beef from these places accounts for almost 90 percent of the total. Australia contributed to 45 percent of the total with volumes rising by 5 percent.

    Imports from Australia have, however, slowed since the start of the year, and in the third quarter, volumes shipped actually fell by 1 percent. Imports from Uruguay, on the other hand, rose by a third, compared with the January to September period in 2013.

    China has historically only imported Uruguayan offal and small volumes of inexpensive boneless beef cuts. However, Uruguay now ranks second to Australia as its top supplier, with a whole range of product in the mix.

    New Zealand maintained its position in the Chinese market, supplying 8 percent more beef than a year earlier.

    Brazil was once the third largest supplier of beef to China with an export value of around 310.6 million yuan (US$51 million). However, China placed a ban on beef from Brazil due to an outbreak of mad cow disease in late 2012. China has now reopened its doors to Brazilian beef; eight plants have already received the green light, and there is a possibility of nine other plants also entering the Chinese market again. However, EBLEX says it is worth noting that these developments are not reflected in the latest trade figures.

    (SD-Agencies)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn