-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Movies -> 
Kingsman: The Secret Service
    2015-04-03  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    《王牌特工:特工学院》

    Starring: Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Caine, Taron Egerton

    Director: Matthew Vaughn

   PLAYING a world-saving and somewhat world-weary superagent, Colin Firth is the epitome of suave, as lethal as he is elegant, in the spy thriller “Kingsman: The Secret Service.” His sad-eyed heroics ground the comic book adaptation, while Samuel L. Jackson brings the goofball villainy, big-time, as a mad genius who concocts a ticking time bomb of a scheme.

    As he did in “X-Men: First Class,” director Matthew Vaughn strikes an energetic balance between cartoonish action and character-driven drama, though the tinge here is darker, with a story that hinges on matters of climate change, the insidiousness of technology and the class divide.

    Just as the cast combines masterly screen vets and impressive newcomers, the film embraces old-school undercover sensibilities while updating them. A self-contained adventure, as opposed to a franchise-launching introductory chapter, the screenplay by Vaughn and Jane Goldman is based on a comic book series by “Kick-Ass” writer Mark Millar and “Watchmen” artist Dave Gibbons (published by Marvel imprint Icon).

    Kingsman is the name of the Savile Row menswear shop that serves as HQ for an organization of impeccably dressed gentleman spies. Headed by the inscrutable Arthur (an extended cameo by Michael Caine), they’re latter-day Knights of the Round Table. Firth’s Harry Hart, code-named Galahad, finds a new sense of purpose as mentor to petty criminal Gary “Eggsy” Unwin (Taron Egerton).

    Sponsoring the teen as a recruit for the Secret Service, Harry’s not just trying to save a street-smart kid from a rudderless existence with his troubled mother (Samantha Womack) and her abusive boyfriend (Geoff Bell); he’s atoning for the botched mission 17 years earlier that cost the life of Eggsy’s dad (Jack Davenport), aka Lancelot.

    That mission, a high-body-count fracas involving a kidnapped professor (Mark Hamill) in a ski chateau, opens the film and sets the tone of jokey mayhem and stylized gore. Making flamboyant first impressions in the scene are Jackson’s cellphone gazillionaire Valentine and his sleek, murderous assistant, Gazelle (Sofia Boutella), named for the flexible-blade prosthetics she wears, a la Oscar Pistorius.

    In the present day, Valentine, whose idiosyncrasies include a prominent lisp and a squeamishness about blood that doesn’t stop him from wreaking havoc, is preparing to press play on a devilishly logical plan to save the human race from the devastation of climate change. The ultimate showdown grows numbing in its back-and-forth, although the screenplay’s clever use of Eggsy’s toddler sibling brings home the panic with impact.

    Vaughn and Goldman, whose previous screenwriting collaborations include “Kick-Ass,” root the story’s crazy gizmos, including Valentine’s use of SIM cards as weapons of mass destruction, in recognizable tech, from biometrics to satellites and mainframes.

    Less recognizable, and something to behold, are Firth’s graceful martial arts moves. Exaggerated by effects and editing, they create a form of live-action animation that reaches its apex in a sequence, set to the wail of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Free Bird,” that pits Harry against the congregation of a Southern church.

    The true engines of the movie are the chalk-and-cheese contrast between Firth’s and Jackson’s characters and the understated father-son dynamic between Harry and Eggsy. In his first major big-screen role, Welsh actor Egerton captures the character’s resentment and suspicion as well as his longing to make something of himself and to be like Harry, who can coolly lay waste to a barroom of hooligans between sips of his pint. Beyond the unexpected physicality that Firth brings to the part, he imbues Harry with a bone-dry wit.

    Lending strong, unfussy support are Sophie Cookson, as Eggsy’s chief competition and only friend in spy school, and the dependable Mark Strong as Scottish spy Merlin.

    The movie is now being screened in Shenzhen. (SD-Agencies)

 

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn