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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
Benefits of Chinese herbs -- not in the way you think
    2015-07-31  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    MODERN science is increasingly unearthing the health benefits of herbs and plants that have long been used in Chinese medicine. But it’s important to note that the benefit revealed by research is rarely something the herb or food was actually used for in its original cultural context, notes Christopher Hafner, a licensed practitioner of TCM. Take a look at some of the herbs and plants commonly used in Chinese medicine that have also been a focus in modern research:

    Huangqi (astragalus)

    The leaves of the perennial huangqi plant are used in TCM as a tonic that is meant to boost the immune system. It’s also believed to treat chronic sores and ulcerations that are supposedly the result of underlying deficiencies of “qi,” or vital energy, and blood.

    Research shows evidence that astragalus has antiviral properties (potentially helping against colds). It may also help people with weakened immune systems from chemotherapy or radiation, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

    Renshen (ginseng root)

    One of the most well-known and widely used of the Chinese herbs, renshen is believed to perform multiple functions in TCM, including increasing both “qi” and “pi” (usually translated as spleen, though TCM practitioners say it has a uniquely Chinese interpretation unlike anything in the conventional understanding of the spleen as an organ).

    Some studies have shown that renshen could help with chronic fatigue syndrome, though results have been mixed.

    Gouqi (lycium chinense)

    Also known as goji berry, gouqi is believed in TCM to be able to strengthen important organs like the kidney and the liver.

    Research shows that goji berries contain zeaxanthins, which are carotenoids that are important for eye health. However, more research is needed to determine the exact benefits of goji berries, as most studies have only been performed on animals.

    Juhua (chrysanthemum

    morifolium)

    Consumed mostly in tea, the chrysanthemum flower is a TCM staple that is believed to cool the body down, clear the liver, and benefit the eyes, as well as treat hypertension and bring down fevers.

    Chrysanthemum has shown some promise in lab studies against breast cancer, but clinical studies on its efficacy in humans have not shown any clear benefits.

    Danggui (Chinese angelica root)

    The dried Chinese angelica root is used in TCM to enrich the blood, improve circulation, and regularize menstruation.

    Research conducted on dang-

    gui has isolated numerous compounds that could have anti-inflammatory, anti-cancerous, and neuroprotective properties.(SD-Agencies)

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