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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
The only thing you can do to prevent a hangover
    2015-09-11  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    EAT a high-protein meal, take a multivitamin, drink a lot of water — nearly everyone has a trick to prevent hangovers.

    And while some hangover-battling moves make more sense than others, new research has proven what we all know on some level: You really can’t do all that much to avoid a hangover after a night of heavy drinking.

    The only way to avoid a hangover is to not drink beyond your limits.

    A group of international scientists from the Netherlands and Canada have surveyed the drinking habits of nearly 800 college students to try to learn more about hangovers.

    Researchers asked 780 Canadian students to share their drinking habits over the previous month, including how many drinks they had, what timeframe they had the drinks in, and the severity of their hangover afterward. Scientists then calculated the students’ estimated blood alcohol concentration.

    The majority of those who said they don’t experience hangovers had an estimated blood alcohol level of less than 0.1 percent, indicating that they might not have been drinking as heavily as they thought. That level, researchers say, might not be enough to produce a hangover the next day.

    In a corresponding study, researchers asked 826 Dutch students about their most recent heavy drinking session, and whether they had food or water after drinking. Nearly 55 percent ate after drinking and were asked to rate their hangover, from “absent” to “extreme.”

    Despite conventional wisdom, the severity of their hangovers wasn’t very different from those who ate nothing after drinking.

    “Currently, there is no hangover cure of which the effectiveness is supported by scientific research,” says lead author Joris Verster, an assistant professor at Utrecht University who has conducted several studies on hangovers.

    Of course, hangovers happen — and women are often more susceptible than men.

    Women’s bodies produce less of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, which is needed to metabolize alcohol. As a result, their blood alcohol level is higher after drinking.

    If you find yourself suffering from a hangover, drinking water will help combat dehydration and taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen may ward off a headache.

    But there is one very obvious way to feel better the morning after. Verster says, “The only way to prevent a hangover is to consume less alcohol.”

    (SD-Agencies)

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