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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Movies -> 
Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation
    2015-09-11  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Starring: Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg, Rebecca Ferguson, Ving Rhames, Sean Harris Director: Christopher McQuarrie

    HOW about this for an impossible mission: a film franchise on its fifth chapter — and nearly 20 years removed from its first installment — that actually gets better over time? “Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation” succeeds on that front and several others, proving to be the most satisfying, gripping and intelligent film yet in the series.

    The action scenes are predictably magnificent, and an excellent supporting turn from fetching new cast member Rebecca Ferguson helps make this a sexy, propulsive, top-notch thriller.

    While a cursory knowledge of previous installments, particularly “Ghost Protocol,” is helpful, newcomers can go into “Rogue Nation” without much trouble. Master secret agent Hunt (Cruise) is on the search for The Syndicate, a clandestine organization that he believes is behind the mysterious deaths of several major international figures. Since CIA Director Alan Hunley (Alec Baldwin) wants Hunt’s IMF team dismantled because of their risk-taking approach to protecting national security, Hunt and his trusty cohort, technology expert-turned-field agent Benji (Simon Pegg), must go underground to track down a coldly brilliant terrorist, Solomon Lane (Sean Harris), whom Hunt suspects is The Syndicate’s ringmaster.

    The challenge for “Mission: Impossible,” as with other long-running franchises, is to increase the stakes with each new installment while maintaining the faintest whiff of plausibility. “Rogue Nation” suffers a tad from this problem — yet again, IMF’s future is threatened as Hunt undertakes a mission that seems, well, impossible — but McQuarrie (taking over the reins from “Ghost Protocol” director Brad Bird) has done a fabulous job of upping the urgency without artificially inflating the suspense.

    Part of his secret may be his first calling as a screenwriter. Winning an Oscar for the twisty “The Usual Suspects,” McQuarrie has gone on to become a director, helming the 2012 Tom Cruise vehicle Jack Reacher. (He was also one of the writers on Bryan Singer’s “Valkyrie,” which again starred Cruise.) The collaboration between filmmaker and star hits a new peak with “Rogue Nation,” which McQuarrie envisions more as an espionage thriller than a conventional action picture. As a result, the new film (with a story credited to McQuarrie and Drew Pearce) represents a merging of the franchise’s best elements, offering a labyrinthine plot similar to the first “Mission: Impossible” (except that it’s not impenetrable) while creating spectacular set pieces that aren’t so over-the-top that they defy logic, a welcome feature of the more recent installments.

    Hunt has never been a particularly complex character, and in “Rogue Nation” he remains a resilient, heroic, slightly opaque figure. But remarkably, this continues not to be an issue, Cruise imbuing him with intensity, athletic grace and just a touch of humor so that he comes across as a witty, compelling protagonist. At 53, Cruise has held onto his boyish enthusiasm and daredevil spirit. (When we first see him in “Rogue Nation,” he’s running at full speed. Soon after, Hunt will be hanging off the edge of a plane as it takes off — a stunt Cruise performed himself.) The movie spends a lot of time reminding us how adroit an agent Hunt is, but “Rogue Nation” rarely comes across as a mere vanity project for Cruise, the venerable star investing so deeply in the character’s life-or-death vocation that one can only agree with the other characters’ admiring assessment of the man’s skill.

    Like “James Bond” movies, “Mission: Impossible” films can sometimes be measured by the strength of their villains and love interests. “Rogue Nation” has superb examples of each, which may come as something of a surprise for long-time fans of the series.

    “Ghost Protocol” still earns top honors for including the single best sequence in a “Mission: Impossible” film, which was Hunt’s death-defying walk outside Kabul’s Burj Khalifa tower. McQuarrie comes close with a bravura underwater sequence that forces Hunt to hold his breath longer than is probably humanly possible, but his specialty in “Rogue Nation” is pulse-pounding chases and maniacally elaborate set pieces in, say, an opera house in the midst of a performance. Globetrotting across London, Casablanca and Vienna, “Rogue Nation” has plenty of eye-popping treasures, all of them shot with rich shadows by cinematographer Robert Elswit.

    The movie is now being screened in Shenzhen. (SD-Agencies)

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