-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
Eating red meat twice weekly may up cancer risk by nearly 20%
    2015-11-06  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    A UNIVERSITY of Oxford study discovered that participants who ate four servings of red meat a week were 42 percent more likely to develop colorectal cancer than those who had one serving or none at all. Participants who ate red meat at least twice a week were 18 percent more likely to develop colorectal cancer than vegetarians.

    The study tracked the meat-eating habits of more than 500,000 British men and women aged 40 to 69. (Researchers didn’t quantify the amount of each serving — they only tracked how often people ate meat.)

    Surprisingly, the research did not find a link between eating processed meats and an increased risk of colorectal cancer, though the World Health Organization (WHO) identified processed meats as a “known human carcinogen,” citing one of the top reasons as its link to colorectal cancer. The WHO experts concluded that each 50-gram portion of processed meat eaten daily increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent.

    Lead study author Kathryn Bradbury, a nutritional epidemiologist at the University of Oxford, says that there may be a few compounds in red meat that explain the link with bowel cancer.

    “Cooking meat produces heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA), which are suspected carcinogens,” she says. “Red meat also contains haem iron and, when eaten, this leads to the formation of N-nitroso-compounds (NOC), which again are suspected to be carcinogenic.”

    The message is simple, Bradbury says: If you’re big on eating red meat, it’s a good idea to cut back.

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a research division of the World Health Organization, announced recently that processed meats such as bacon, sausage, ham, and hot dogs cause cancer.

    Processed meats were classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans, in the same group as smoking tobacco and asbestos exposure. Substances in this group have “sufficient evidence” of carcinogenicity in humans, according to the IARC.

    The IARC defines processed meats as “meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking, or other processes to enhance flavor or improve preservation.” Most processed meats contain pork or beef, it adds, but may also contain other red meats, poultry, or meat by-products.

    Popular processed meats include sausage, jerky, bacon, hot dogs, and kebabs, along with everyday lunchmeat such as ham, salami, corned beef, pastrami, and bologna, as well as canned meats and packaged meat-based sauces.

    Red meats include beef, veal, pork, lamb, mutton, horse, and goat.

    The organization said that the individual risk of developing colorectal cancer from eating processed meats is “small” but increases with the amount of meat a person eats.

    The panel also determined that eating 100 grams of red meat per day may raise a person’s risk of colorectal cancer by 17 percent.

    A study by the U.S. National Cancer Institute of 500,000 people found that those who ate red meat daily were 30 percent more likely to die during a 10-year period than those who ate very little red meat. Eating processed meats also increased the risk of death.

    (SD-Agencies)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn