-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Opinion -> 
Chinese students cause Aussie milk powder crisis
    2015-11-16  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Chris Edwards

    2045038940@qq.com

    AUSTRALIAN news media has been awash in recent weeks over the inability of local families to purchase baby formula. So far this month, the Australian news media has covered stories of:

    *Supermarkets introducing four- and eight-can limits on ALL purchasers of cans of milk powder;

    *Signs written in Chinese informing Chinese people that there is a limit on the number of cans they can purchase at any one time;

    *Parents traveling for four hours to find baby formula;

    *Stores and pharmacies having to hide the product in backrooms for regular customers to ensure that they can at least get some;

    *Parents traveling to 30 different stores to try and find the milk powder that their baby has been taking for some time; and

    *Parents being forced to go to their local hospital to get the formula they need to feed their child because there is simply no product in their local area or within hundreds of kilometers.

    Fault has been attributed almost entirely at the hands of Chinese university students and families, who bulk purchase cans of it to be shipped back to China. A story roared around Facebook last week of three young Chinese people buying a whole pallet (50 boxes) of a particular brand of powdered milk while another “stood guard” over the last three boxes that did not fit on the two trollies that had already been commandeered for this purpose.

    Advertisements on Taobao and eBay show prices for these cans of “white gold” can be as high as six to 13 times the retail price in Australia, but the profit motive for Chinese university students is putting Australian children at risk. The situation has gotten so bad for some families that they have to try and buy their preferred brand of milk powder on Taobao, Tmall, JD.com and other Chinese websites at hugely inflated markups.

    These Australian infants cannot have breast milk for health reasons — that is why they need the baby formula. The risks to their child for not having the formula are enormous and it takes a long time to wean a child off of one brand and onto another brand.

    I understand what happened in 2008 and the attitude of consumers that products from overseas are safer, of better quality. However, the stripping of supermarkets shelves, particularly in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, is harming large numbers of families.

    

    Before writing this article, I spoke to my brother and sister back in Australia. Both of them have young children and are involved in parent groups. I asked them what they had experienced with regards to this situation. Both admitted they had not had to deal with this problem themselves but also agreed that they had parents in the groups that were getting frantic about their inability to access their preferred brands.

    Is there a solution? The moves that the Chinese Government has made in regards to food safety are a good start, but I think the best way to improve the situation would be for Australian and New Zealand producers to work with Chinese producers to set up plants in China, that way the milk powder could be made here in China and the pressure would be reduced on families back in Australia.

    (The author is an Australian English teacher in Futian District.)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn