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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Campus -> 
Communication and creative thinking stressed in overseas study
    2016-03-16  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Anna Zhao

    anna.whizh@yahoo.com

    Chinese students going to study overseas should be more open to communication and improve their creative thinking abilities, said experts at an overseas study fair held on Sunday in Futian District.

    Organized by Hong Kong-based overseas study agent Amber Education, the fair had 31 schools from Britain, the United States, Canada and New Zealand presenting their latest education policies.

    Amber Education said that Shenzhen students tend to have better awareness of international education and that they seem to get prepared at an early age for overseas study by, for example, improving their language skills.

    The average age of local students going abroad is declining because more parents want their children to be exposed to an international cultural environment at an early stage in their life, Amber Education said.

    Shenzhen students generally have good English speaking and listening skills, but their writing skills are relatively weak, said Amber Education.

    Business-related subjects at overseas schools remain a preferable choice for most Chinese students, followed by design and media. Local parents and students often rely on a school’s overall ranking when choosing a school, it said.

    Paul Goodwin, recruitment consultant from Cambridge Tutor College in London, a boarding school at which 85 percent of its students come from overseas, said the school has small class sizes of six students - normally a U.K. boarding school has a class size between 15 to 20 - so that each student can have a fair share of attention from teachers and can fully participate in class activities.

    Goodwin, whose school has 40 students from China, said problem-solving skills are somewhat lacking among Chinese students, who are otherwise generally hardworking and intelligent.

    “In later life, there is not an answer to every question, so how to solve a problem is important… You solve by thinking in different ways and methods, applying something new to something else, and that’s what teaching and learning are about in the U.K. — it’s to make the mind more flexible at our job,” Goodwin said.

    He said in the past, it was mostly rich Chinese families that sent their children abroad, but now changes have taken place as collaboration between Chinese and British enterprises has expanded.

    “There is more collaboration through which we can really understand each other on different levels, through education, research and partnership on industry development. The situation has been replaced by a genuine exchange of ideas, information, technology, engineering,” Goodwin said. “I would like to see students all over the world come to our school and mix, because our children will eventually work together in later life — it’s important to make our students understand they are going to be partners in later life.”

    

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