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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Campus -> 
Shenzhen student wins UK sociology essay award
    2016-04-06  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Cao Zhen

    caozhen0806@126.com

    Kari Wang, a 16-year-old Chinese student at Shenzhen College of International Education (SCIE) in Shuiwei, Futian District, won the BSA Teaching Group National Sixth Form Sociology Competition in February for writing an essay on why education will continue to be an important topic for sociologists in the future.

    Kari, who won an iPad mini for herself and 250 British pounds (US$356) for her school’s sociology department, based the essay on her personal studying experience in Shenzhen. Five of her Chinese classmates, Sylvia Wang, Hermione Zhou, Billy Li, Arthur Chen and Yvonne Feng, also joined the competition by researching and writing essays on terrorism, the gender divide in school subjects, the digital revolution and human confidence.

    The annual competition is organized by the British Sociological Association (BSA). Its entries are mostly received from sixth formers in Britain. This year, the entrants, aged 16-19, were given the task of answering the question “What is the most important topic for sociologists to study over the next 20 years?” in a 2,000-word written piece or a 10-minute podcast or video clip.

    Studying A-Level courses in SCIE, where most students plan to study abroad, Kari conducted research on the globalization of education in China, which is specifically focused on Chinese students studying overseas. In the essay, she cited her experience of migrating from a quiet small city to Shenzhen for better education and designed an online questionnaire for students from primary schools to colleges, to support her conclusion that “[Education] is a matter of the persistence of human intelligence, the prerequisite for further advancement, and is definitely not just limited to the school curriculum. A reform of education in a global context is taking place through a silent revolution.”

    In an email to Kari’s sociology teacher Richard Driscoll, the BSA said the judges were very impressed with the essay: “Kari’s work reflects a good research knowledge base and draws on her own experiences to illustrate concepts including social stratification, cosmopolitanism and global mindsets. This was a very articulate and well-understood piece of writing.”

    “I want to study abroad to explore my interests, instead of just sitting exams,” Kari told the Shenzhen Daily in an interview. “I’m quite interested in sociology. This course offers us different perspectives of one issue. We can also relate different issues from different perspectives.”

    Before entering the competition, the six students had studied sociology for only three months. “I didn’t have quite a systematic understanding of this whole discipline. I only read a book on inequality before the competition, but I decided to choose education as my topic because as a student it’s hard for me to interview people from different social classes to write on inequality. Since the students and teachers around me were more approachable, I could explore more about the education system and the trend of overseas study in China,” said Kari.

    She initially wanted to research the Chinese education system, but her teacher thought it would be too much to study. “Narrowing it down really helped me in my research process, so I could focus on a specific issue and elaborate on it in depth,” said Kari.

    Driscoll, who has been teaching sociology at SCIE for two years, has lengthy experience in teaching sociology in Britain. He said he had confidence in his Chinese students competing with U.K. students even though the latter have studied sociology for considerably longer than the Chinese students.

    “British students have studied sociology from earlier grades,” he said. “But I have some exceptional students here [in Shenzhen]. They work incredibly hard. When I began my first lesson at the school, I was amazed that one of the students had read lots of [sociology] books before. You’ve never ever had that in the U.K.”

    He said the six students had only one week to prepare their essays and according to the competition criteria, he was not permitted to proofread their essays. “It was independent research and I could only suggest topics and books to read,” said Driscoll.

    “The time was very tight. I struggled for a few nights at the library because it’s one thing to do your research and it’s another thing to present your ideas in a clear essay,” said Kari.

    The six students’ essays follow standard essay formats with academic writing styles and their research was carried out in the form of observations, interviews and questionnaire-based studies. “Their writings are as standard as undergraduates. Students who entered the competition gained valuable independent research skills and also the opportunity to explore the subject beyond the restraints of the specifications,” said Driscoll.

    Sylvia said she learned how to do research from various resources and to combine her readings and research to support her arguments in a correct and standard format, such as how to stage references and a bibliography. Student Yvonne said, “I enjoy the process of giving explanations after analyzing the facts and data.”

    “This competition demonstrates that students with the right passion for learning and dedication can achieve whatever they set their hearts on,” said Driscoll.

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