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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Opinion -> 
Uncle Sam’s hilarious talk of safety
    2016-06-06  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Wu Guangqiang

    jw368@163.com

    UNCLE Sam is the world’s best actor, just in the sense of impudence.

    One of his favorite performances is brandishing a lethal weapon at the door of other people’s houses, some of which are thousands of miles away from his, and accusing the victims of threatening his safety, while shrieking complaints that the victims’ defensive moves are “unsafe” and “unprofessional.”

    The latest scene of this ever-lasting play occurred on May 17. According to a statement by the Pentagon, on that day, “two Chinese fighters … conducted an ‘unsafe’ intercept of a U.S. spy plane in international air space over the South China Sea.”

    This incident immediately reminds me of a similar one with a fatal outcome 15 years ago. On April 1, 2001, a U.S. Navy EP-3E signals intelligence aircraft was conducting a surveillance mission in airspace close to Chinese coastal areas near Hainan Island — as U.S. planes had done so for many years — when it was intercepted by two Chinese fighter jets.

    The confrontation led to a mid-air collision between a Chinese fighter jet and the U.S. spy aircraft, leading to the crash of the Chinese jet and the death of pilot Wang Wei.

    The damaged EP-3 made an emergency landing at a Chinese air base on Hainan Island, an act described as a serious incident in violation of international law and Chinese sovereignty by Chinese officials.

    The U.S. plane, with its 24 American crewmen, were under China’s custody for 11 days until U.S. Ambassador to China Joe Prueher sent a letter of regret expressing that the U.S. was “very sorry” for Wang’s death. Though the U.S. did not apologize for its violation of Chinese sovereignty as demanded by China, China on April 12 released the crew and the plane. Obviously, China didn’t want China-U.S. relations be damaged because of the incident.

    Unfortunately, unlike China, which always mates its words to its deeds in maintaining a healthy China-U.S. relation, the U.S.’s actions hardly ever correspond with his words. Over the years, the U.S. has never ceased provoking China by instigating and backing China’s neighboring countries with territorial disputes with China to escalate confrontations with China, sending warships and military planes to the waters and airspace close to the Chinese territory.

    The largest military giant of the world who keeps flexing its military muscle around the world still has the nerve to moan about the victim’s “unprofessional conduct.”

    The silver-tongued American diplomatic officials have a way to call black white, but they can never erase facts from history. They said that Chinese fighter jets were within only 50 feet of the U.S. aircraft, but they failed to explain why the U.S. aircraft was only dozens of miles away from Chinese airspace. Does American culture see standing before someone else showing them the middle finger without physical assault as a friendly gesture?

    

    When it comes to a “dangerous distance,” let’s recall how the U.S. has managed to shift the originally peaceful South China Sea to troubled water little by little.

    It’s true that there have been territorial disputes for hundreds of years in the South China Sea between China and a number of neighboring countries including the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia and Brunei, but the region was relatively quiet and peaceful, except for occasional clashes. As the largest country in Asia, China has never tried to take over disputed territories or threatened to settle the disputes by force.

    China exercised great restraint in the area, even though smaller countries like Vietnam and the Philippines took concrete actions to occupy certain disputed islets or reefs and to militarize them.

    China did not expand any islets or reefs, nor militarize them, until the U.S. began to increasingly build up its military presence in the region and demonstrate its apparent intention of containing China’s rise.

    Who expects China to sit idle in the face of the U.S.’s aggressive attitude?

    As the Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi pointed out, it is the U.S.’s militarization of the South China Sea that prompted China to react with proper countermeasures.

    (The author is an English tutor and freelance writer.)

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