-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Glamour -> 
Gloria DeHaven dies at age 91
    2016-08-03  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    Gloria DeHaven, the perky* singing actress who starred in a parade* of breezy Hollywood musicals in the 1940s and 1950s and gave Frank Sinatra his first big-screen kiss, has died at age 91, her agent said on Monday.

    DeHaven, who appeared in more than two dozen films starting as a child in a bit role in Charlie Chaplin’s last silent movie, died on Saturday in hospice care in Las Vegas, Scott Stander said in an email.

    The actress suffered a stroke* a few months ago, the agent said.

    A versatile* singer from a show business family, she thrived* in Hollywood musicals, mostly from the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio, until the genre* fell out of fashion in the 1950s.

    DeHaven starred in “Two Girls and a Sailor” (1944) with Van Johnson, June Allyson and Jimmy Durante; “Summer Holiday” (1948) with Mickey Rooney; “Yes Sir That’s My Baby” (1949) with Donald O’Connor; “Summer Stock” (1950) with Judy Garland and Gene Kelly; and “So This Is Paris” (1955) with Tony Curtis.

    In the musical “Step Lively” (1944), DeHaven gave a young Sinatra his first on-screen smooch*.

    In the late 1950s, DeHaven’s film career stalled* and she turned to acting on television and in stage musicals and singing in nightclubs. She returned to the big screen for the 1997 comedy “Out to Sea” with Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau.

    She was born in Los Angeles on July 23, 1925 to parents who were vaudeville* performers. She made her film debut with a small role in Chaplin’s “Modern Times” (1936) co-starring Paulette Goddard, a silent gem released in the era of talkies*, exploring the pitfalls* of modern industrialized society.

    Her breakout role was in the Lucille Ball musical comedy “Best Foot Forward” (1943), a film that also boosted Allyson’s fortunes. (SD-Agencies)

 

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn