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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
There could be a ‘starchy’ flavor
    2016-09-09  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    SCOOCH over sweetness, sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami. Turns out there might be a new taste on the chopping block and it could explain why we crave carbs.

    A new study from Oregon State University in Corvallis suggests “starchy” might be the secret sixth flavor and it could explain a lot about our food cravings.

    Scientists previously believed that our love of delicious carbs — pasta, bread, frankly anything carby, was simply down to the sugars present. They thought our love of the carby-stuff was down to the interaction of the sweetness taste profile. But the latest research suggests that starch could be a taste in its own right.

    Juyun Lim, a researcher on the study, said, “Every culture has a major source of complex carbohydrate. The idea that we can’t taste what we’re eating doesn’t make sense.”

    As New Scientist reports, complex carbohydrates such as starch are made of chains of sugar molecules and are an important source of energy in our diets. However, food scientists have tended to ignore the idea that we might be able to specifically taste them, says Lim. Because enzymes in our saliva break starch down into shorter chains and simple sugars, many have assumed we detect starch by tasting these sweet molecules.

    For the study, researchers gave volunteers a range of different carbohydrate solutions, containing both long and short carbohydrate chains. The participants were able to make out floury flavors and tended to prefer more complex carbs over more sugar-focused treats, like chocolate.

    When given solutions with both long and short carbohydrate chains, the participants called the taste “starchy,” with Asian participants describing the flavor as “rice-like,” while Caucasians described it as “bread-like” or “pasta like.”

    Testers were even able to make out the “starchy” flavor when they were given compounds that blocked their tongue’s receptors for sweet tastes — which seems to suggest that starch and sugars are actually separate tastes.

    The results could help to shed light on why we all love bread, pasta and other carby deliciousness (especially on a hangover) because we specifically love the taste of starch.

    (SD-Agencies)

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