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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
Don’t need much sleep? Science says you’re wrong
    2016-09-23  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    IF you’re one of those people who believe they can survive on very little sleep, think again.

    According to research published in the journal Brain and Behavior, brain patterns have been identified in “habitual short sleepers,” which found that while some of these people may report not experiencing daytime fatigue or dysfunction, they’re probably more tired than they realize.

    It’s been long understood that beauty sleep is imperative for physical and mental health, since it can affect energy levels and cognitive performance. Lack of sleep can contribute to obesity, coronary disease, and all-cause mortality risk.

    In order to understand how the inner connections work in the brain, investigators from University of Utah analyzed brain connectivity shown on MRI scans in nearly 900 patients. The researchers divided their subjects into three groups — those who reportedly slept a normal amount of hours over the previous month, those who slept six hours or less each night yet felt drained, and those who slept six hours or less each night and felt alert.

    Interestingly enough, some of the people drifted off during the MRI scan — even those who reportedly claimed they never experienced daytime drowsiness.

    Perhaps their wakeup brain systems are perpetually in overdrive, which “leaves open the possibility that, in a boring MRI scanner, they have nothing to do to keep them awake and thus fall asleep,” said study co-author Christopher Jones.

    When the health professionals examined the differences between the brain regions, they uncovered that short sleepers who claim that they have no issue staying wide awake during the day showed increased connectivity between the sensory cortices, amygdala, and hippocampus.

    “Prior research suggests that this can occur in phasic REM states and may function, in part, to facilitate memory consolidation,” said Paula G. Williams, study co-author and psychology professor. “So if some short sleepers have rapid drops in sleep stages — both during night sleep and perhaps in daytime ‘microsleeps’ — this might contribute to their perception of daytime alertness.”

    “What we know from prior research is that natural short sleepers — those who routinely sleep less than six hours regardless of their schedule — are high in behavioral activation and reward drive, often with hypomanic characteristics, for example, high activity, distractibility, inflated self-esteem or grandiosity, and engaging in pleasurable, but potentially risky behavior,” said Williams. “We believe they are likely engaging in highly stimulating activities that serve to override the physiological need to sleep.”

    (SD-Agencies)

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