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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
Why we’re scared of clowns
    2016-10-14  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

    BEFORE you don that creepy clown outfit this Halloween, it might make sense to know why clowns are so creepy for most of us.

    Sad, scary, malicious, and otherwise negative images of clowns — and the men behind the overwrought makeup — go back to Victorian times, according to the Smithsonian. A long, detailed history of our fear of clowns, also known as coulrophobia, credits Charles Dickens with securing a place for the scary clown in our popular stories.

    It’s little coincidence that other pillars of entertainment over the last couple of centuries have followed suit. Stephen King’s villain Pennywise from “It,” Steven Spielberg’s murderous clown toy in “Poltergeist,” and the many forms of Batman’s arch nemesis the Joker are just a few that come to mind.

    At the heart of coulrophobia, according to experts on clowns and human psychology alike, lie two distinct issues — the makeup and the person behind the makeup. As detailed in the Smithsonian’s research:

    “Adult clown phobics are unsettled by the clown’s face-paint and the inability to read genuine emotion on a clown’s face, as well as the perception that clowns are able to engage in manic behavior, often without consequences.”

    A commenter named Pyno on the Coulrophobia Facts website puts it quite well in describing their fear:

    “The overblown makeup around the mouth usually looks so wide that it seems more of a scream than a smile. Couple this with the over-emphasized eyebrow arches and it looks less like a face experiencing joy and more like a face experiencing some kind of horrific torture.

    “As part of their routine they will almost always move in very close, invading your personal space whether you want them to or not. They are also generally “too much” — too much movement, makeup, color, noise, just too much.”

    So before you don the clown garb, it may make sense to pause and decide why you want to look like Bizarre Bozo or Pretty Pennywise. You could end up scarring someone for life.(SD-Agencies)

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