-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Special Report -> 
Cultural heritage finds new opportunity
    2017-05-16  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Nan Nan

there_sun@163.com

THE booth of Jiangzhou carved lacquer technique from Yuncheng City in Shanxi Province in the Intangible Cultural Heritage Hall at the Shenzhen Convention and Exhibition Center attracted many visitors when the inheritor and proprietor showcased the over 1,000-year-old skill yesterday, the last day of the 13th China (Shenzhen) International Cultural Industries Fair.

After applying 100 to 200 coats of lacquer, the base object, which is usually wood, turns into highly refined lacquerware. Then the craftsman carves decorative patterns onto the hard and smooth surface layer using a special L-shaped steel graver.

People are now paying more attention to cultural heritages than before, said the inheritor He Pengfei, who has participated in the ICIF six times. This year a technology company contacted He about doing live shows online to promote this skill. They plan to first do several shows and then if the show gets popular, open a long-term show to introduce the whole process involved in making one product. The ICIF provides a good platform for advertising, He said.

The earliest practice of carving lacquerware began in the Tang Dynasty (618–907). However, this technique had been lost several times before the State-run craft factory reinstated the skill according to extant documents. He’s father learned the skill from there. He quit his job in a big city and succeeded his father once he got ill. “I enjoy the process of making lacquerware but this is not my personal choice,” said He.

He admitted that the pressure does exist, and that he has to carefully consider how inheritance, development, preservation and creation should be handled.

The technique is time-consuming and costly, usually taking between eight and 24 months, and the profit gained from this technique is not great. That’s why there are few young people willing to learn this skill, according to He Junming, He Pengfei’s father. Currently, the inheritors are between 30 and 50 years old, so the heritage is basically on the verge of dying.

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn