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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
The real reason why Spaniards eat late
    2017-May-16  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

While travelers might attribute Spain’s late mealtimes to the country’s laidback Mediterranean attitude, the real reason is a little more peculiar.

Spaniards are living in the wrong time zone, and have been for more than 70 years.

Glance at a map and you’ll realize that Spain — sitting along the same longitude as the United Kingdom, Portugal and Morocco — should be in Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). But Spain goes by Central European Time (CET), putting it in sync with the Serbian capital Belgrade, more than 2,500 km east of Madrid.

In 1940, General Francisco Franco changed Spain’s time zone, moving the clocks one hour forward in solidarity with Nazi Germany.

For Spaniards, who at the time were utterly devastated by the Spanish Civil War, complaining about the change did not even cross their minds. They continued to eat at the same time, but because the clocks had changed, their 1 p.m. lunches became 2 p.m. lunches, and they were suddenly eating their 8 p.m. dinners at 9 p.m.

After World War II ended, the clocks were never changed back.

Being 60 minutes ahead of the correct time zone means the sun rises later and sets later, bestowing Spain with gloriously long summer evenings and 10 p.m. sunsets.

Those who run Spain’s tourist resorts believe that more sunlight is a large draw for visitors.

But for many Spaniards, living in the wrong time zone has resulted in sleep deprivation and decreased productivity. The typical Spanish work day begins at 9 a.m. After a two-hour lunch break between 2 and 4 p.m., employees return to work, ending their day around 8 p.m. The later working hours force Spaniards to save their social lives for the late hours. Prime-time television doesn’t start until 10:30 p.m.

Spaniards have traditionally coped with their late nights by taking a mid-morning coffee break and a two-hour lunch break, giving them the opportunity to enjoy one of the country’s most infamous traditions: the siesta.

尽管游客们可能会认为西班牙晚餐时间晚是因为这个国家地中海式的闲适生活态

度,但真正的原因有些奇怪。70多年以来,西班牙人一直生活在错误的时区里。

扫一眼地图,你就会知道西班牙所处的经度与英国、葡萄牙和摩洛哥相同,因此应该采用格林尼治时间。然而,西班牙依照的是欧洲中部时间,与位于马德里往东2500多公里外的塞尔维亚首都贝尔格莱德同步。

1940年,弗朗西斯科•佛朗哥将军改变了西班牙的时区,将时间往前调了一小时,与纳粹德国保持一致。

那时西班牙人正因内战而苦不堪言,完全没心思去抱怨时间的更改。他们仍然在相同的时间点用餐,但因为记时的方式改

变,他们午饭的时间也就由下午一点改为两点,以往晚上8点的晚餐时间也突然之间变成了9点。

二战结束后,这个记时方式没再改回来。

比正确的时区提前60分钟意味着太阳升起和落下的时间会往后推迟,这使西班牙享受到夏日极长的夜晚,以及晚上10点的落

日。西班牙旅游度假区的负责人认为,更长的日照时间对游客吸引力很大。

对许多西班牙人来说,在错误的时区生活已经造成睡眠不足以及工作效率下降的问题。西班牙人工作日一般从早上9点开始,2点到4点这两小时进行午休,之后重新开始工作,大约晚上8点结束一天的工作。较晚的工作时间迫使西班牙人将社交生活挪到更晚的时间点。黄金时间的电视节目也是晚上10:30才开始。

西班牙人习惯依靠上午的咖啡时间和两小时的午休来熬夜,这使他们有机会享受西班牙最臭名远扬的传统:午睡。

(Chinadaily.com.cn)

Words to Learn 相关词汇

【经度】jīngdù longitude a geographic coordinate that specifies the east-west position of a point on the earth’s surface

【想起】xiǎngqǐ cross one’s mind come to know, realize

 

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