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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Tahiti:‘Embraced by Mana’
    2017-July-13  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

The island “country” of Tahiti is, in fact, not a country at all. Tahiti is the main island in a group of 118 islands and atolls (of which 67 are inhabited) called “French Polynesia.” And even that is not technically a country; it is, rather, an “overseas collectivity,” a part of France lying in the South Pacific Ocean, well outside of the mother country.

French Polynesia does, however, have its own legislative assembly which appoints a president, who in turn answers to a High Commissioner, a French national who oversees France’s interests. The justice system, university education, security and defense are administered by the French government; primary and secondary education, health services and environmental matters are controlled by the local government.

The High Commissioner and the president live in the city of Papeete on Tahiti, the capital for all of French Polynesia, which includes five separate island groups: the Society Islands, the Tuamotu Archipelago, the Gambier Islands, the Marquesas Islands and the Austral Islands.

According to a 1996 law, “French is the official language. Tahitian and other Polynesian languages can be used.” Nearly 95 percent of the population can speak, read and write French. Around 30 percent report a Polynesian language as their home language — mostly Tahitian.

Around 1 percent speak a dialect of Chinese at home (about half of those are Hakka), though recent estimates say the population is about 12 percent ethnic Chinese. These residents dominate the commercial enterprises on Tahiti to the point that locals say they are going “to the Chinese” to indicate they are going shopping!

Most French Polynesians are Christian, with Protestants outnumbering Catholics about five to three.

Tourism in French Polynesia centers on Tahiti, which is one reason we associate that name with the entire group. A recent campaign declared the island “Embraced by Mana.” Mana is an idea from old Polynesian beliefs, a life-force or energy that infuses everything. According to Tahiti’s tourism director, “everyone who visits Tahiti is touched by it... [It] leaves visitors feeling richer and more connected.”

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. fills, penetrates

2. sharing ancestry with a particular group of people

3. tasked with making laws

4. shops, restaurants, etc.

5. has responsibility for

6. coral islands

7. police services

8. abroad, beyond the sea

9. in the proper order

10. surrounded, enclosed

 

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