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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture
Bronze beauty from Baoji
    2017-October-10  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Cao Zhen

caozhen0806@126.com

AT Shenzhen Museum’s big autumn show “Initiative Taken by Zhou,” 182 sets of the finest ancient bronzeware from Baoji, Shaanxi Province, are on display, showcasing the beauty and technique involved in the making of bronzeware during the Zhou Dynasty (1046-256 B.C.).

The awe-inspiring relics are on loan from Weibin District Museum, Qishan County Museum, Fufeng County Museum, Zhouyuan Museum and Baoji Bronze Museum in Baoji City. Zhouyuan, an ancient area which includes today’s Qishan, Fufeng and Meixian counties, is acclaimed as the “homeland of bronzeware” for its large quantity of bronzeware excavated from tombs in surrounding regions.

Bronzes are the most impressive surviving objects from the Chinese Bronze Age, which began in the Xia Dynasty (2070-1600 B.C.), and ritual bronzeware form the bulk of collections of Chinese antiquities. During the Shang Dynasty (1600-1046 B.C.), China became one of the most skilled bronze-working civilizations in the ancient world as people learned to heat, melt and cast metal to make cooking utensils, tools, weapons and other household items. The Zhou Dynasty, with its first capitals in Feng and Hao in today’s Shaanxi, produced what many consider the zenith of Chinese bronzeware. The preceding Shang bronze culture imparted its influence on Zhou Dynasty bronze-working.

In the exhibition, visitors can admire ritual bronzes that have inscriptions on the bottom of their interiors relating the history of Zhou kings. It also records family emblems, family members’ titles and the personal history of the owner, providing reliable data for understanding life during the Zhou Dynasty.

The exhibition showcases bronzes both for practical use and ritual use, with the latter forming the bulk of surviving Chinese bronze artifacts. The bronzeware on display is categorized according to use: sacrificial vessels, wine vessels, food and drink vessels, musical instruments, weapons, measuring containers and more. Each category has a great number of types and shapes. One of the many appeals of bronze to visitors is that it can take exceptionally fine detail, such as spectacular decorations and elaborately-carved designs of beasts.

Dates: Until Dec. 12

Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m., closed Mondays

Venue: Shenzhen Museum, Block A, Civic Center, Futian District (福田区市民中心A区深圳博物馆新馆)

Metro: Line 2 or 4, Civic Center Station (市民中心站), Exit B

 

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