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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Tech and Science -> 
Is this the interactive road of the future?
    2017-10-11  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

At first glance it looks like any normal road in the middle of a quiet street. But when this stretch of highway identifies pedestrians* preparing to cross from one side to the other, it bursts into action with an interactive light-up display showing the safest route to walk and alerting drivers and cyclists of people in the road ahead.

The prototype has been commissioned by insurer Direct Line to showcase how urban streets could become reactive to save the lives of pedestrians in the future.

The insurer worked with University College London and urban design specialists Umbrellium to create this section of highway.

The working prototype is a 22-meter long section made up of a patchwork of LED* panels. Using cameras positioned at each end of the street, the technological brain of the system monitors what’s happening on the stretch of highway and triggers the panels to light up to offer a safe place for pedestrians to cross and also alert other road users that there are people in the road up ahead.

The intelligent computer can even map and preempt pedestrians’ movement to respond to alerts it flashes up through the road surface. Because it is fully adaptable, it can measure how many people are standing at the side of the road waiting to cross and adjust the width of the zebra crossing it creates through the panels.

The cameras can also detect when unusual risks occur, such as a child chasing a football into oncoming traffic. It can also provide warning signals to pedestrians, notifying them when they’re being hidden from another road user’s view by a high-sided vehicle, like a bus or truck.

The pavement also glows to grab to attention of pedestrians engrossed in their mobile phones or listening to music to prevent them from strolling into the road without looking.(SD-Agencies)

 

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