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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World
US formally proposes scrapping Obama’s carbon-cutting plan
    2017-October-12  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

THE head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) formally proposed on Tuesday scrapping the agency’s Obama-era plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, as the Trump administration seeks to slash fossil fuel regulation.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt issued a notice that the agency intended to repeal the Clean Power Plan, which it said relied on controversial calculations of economic costs and benefits.

The agency said it is “committed to righting the wrongs of the Obama administration by cleaning the regulatory slate.”

The EPA is obliged to regulate carbon emissions after it found in 2009 that pollution caused by such emissions endangers human health.

But it left open the question of when a new plan would emerge. “Any replacement rule will be done carefully, properly, and with humility, by listening to all those affected by the rule,” said the EPA.

Pruitt said Monday in Kentucky that he would sign the repeal proposal, but the EPA unveiled the notice in a press release Tuesday with little fanfare. Ending the plan could save up to US$33 billion in compliance costs in coming years, it said.

The move is part of Republican President Donald Trump’s plan to revive the coal industry and boost domestic fossil fuel output. His administration has promised to reduce regulations on coal and drilling, which tend to be in states that form part of Trump’s voter base.

But environmentalists and other supporters of the plan said Pruitt’s cost estimates “cooked the book” and did not fully consider billions of dollars in savings from reduced medical bills that would result from steep cuts in pollution from coal.

The estimate also did not fully consider the future damage done from carbon emissions and the costs of U.S. carbon pollution abroad, critics say.

The EPA did not issue a timeline on replacing the plan, only saying it would issue a rule in the “near future.”

The ambiguity could delay fresh investment in electricity generation, an industry rife with aging plants, analysts said.

(SD-Agencies)

 

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