-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Nepal: Once is not enough
    2017-November-13  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

Like many countries of medium or smaller size — and especially those sandwiched between titans — Nepal is sometimes indistinguishable from its neighbors. With China to the north and India to the south — the world’s number one and two countries in population — it is often confused with one or the other.

For example, it is often repeated that the historic Buddha was an Indian sage. True, but his birthplace is recognized as Lumbini, in Nepal. What was known until a decade ago as the Kingdom of Nepal (since 2008, a republic) was not formed until 1768, though the Newar people have occupied the region from time immemorial.

“Newar” and “Nepal,” by the way, are two forms of the same word. A legend says the country was under a supernatural protector (“pala”) named Nemi, a sage from India who had moved to the mountains to practice austerities. “Nemi pala” became “Nepal.” If nothing else, this betokens the rich cultural exchange between what is now two separate modern countries.

Likewise, since Nepal shares the Himalayas with the Tibetan region of China, Nepal’s most prominent features — its mountain peaks — are sometimes misplaced. It doesn’t help that the China/Nepal border runs right through the summit of the world’s highest mountain, known in English as Mount Everest. On the other hand, the famed Annapurna — the world’s 10th-highest peak — is within Nepal’s borders.

The Tibetan language and culture, as one would expect of such proximity, are common in the north. Kathmandu, the nation’s capital and largest city, lies in a valley at 1,400 meters. It was once a focus for the Himalayan branch of the ancient Silk Road, and consequently developed a cosmopolitan style of art and architecture.

But compared to those lofty regions, southern Nepal — contiguous with India — is at a more modest elevation. This area, known as the Terai, is predominantly grassland and swamp, and comprises about a quarter of Nepal’s land area. Elevation ranges from 67 to 300 meters, the higher averages naturally being in the north. It is the base of Nepal’s agriculture and most of its industry.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. outstanding, easily noticed

2. acts of severe self-denial

3. not so big or great

4. put in the wrong location

5. not able to be told apart

6. placed tightly between two things

7. giants

8. wise person, saint

9. high

10. connected, not separated from

 

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn