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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Business_Markets -> 
Guangzhou sets out to retool its economy
    2017-11-24  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

GUANGZHOU, a major manufacturing hub, is doling out subsidies and free land as it sets out to retool its economy.

On a sunny afternoon in early November, several dozen software engineers and designers are anxiously preparing for a test flight of the EHang 184, a compact metal and glass pod outfitted with eight propellers.

The self-steering, single-passenger craft could begin buzzing through the skies of Dubai as early as next year, said Hu Huazhi, the 40-year-old chain-smoking founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of EHang, a Guangzhou-based maker of drones. The leaders of the Arab city-state want one-quarter of all transport to be autonomous by 2030 and are in talks with EHang about supplying a fleet of air taxis.

Earning bragging rights for building one of the world’s first flying cars is not just a corporate goal. “Our company’s development is also an integral component of the Guangzhou city government’s plan” to move up the technology ladder, said Hu as he showed visitors around the company’s offices and flight command center, which are housed inside an abandoned amusement park devoted to the wonders of space travel.

Some 19 miles away, at a factory complex owned by Guangzhou Automobile Group Co. (GAC), rows of orange-and-black German-made industrial robots pivot and plunge as they assemble and solder Trumpchi-brand SUVs, with few workers in sight. With the blessing and support of local officials, the carmaker is building a US$6.5 billion industrial park nearby to produce connected new energy vehicles.

“The economic structural transformation you see here is not only for the benefit of enterprises — we also have a responsibility to the country,” said GAC president Feng Xingya. “We are trying to achieve innovation-driven development, and we must carry out the government’s policy to succeed.”

Guangzhou is starting to look like the poster child for China’s current effort to transform its economy.

“Made in China 2025,” an initiative unveiled by the government two years ago, directs cities and companies to shift out of low-cost, labor-intensive manufacturing and into higher value-added production.

State planners want firms to become globally competitive in established industries as well as dominate new ones like drones and artificial intelligence.

“China wants to raise productivity in every part of the economy. And that includes improving the quality of human talent, how capital is used, and how technology is developed,” said Scott Kennedy, director of the Project on Chinese Business and Political Economy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.

“They think that doesn’t happen naturally. The government has to put their finger on the scale to make that transition happen in a way that is productive for the country.”

The “Made in China 2025” initiative sets ambitious targets for things such as the deployment of Chinese-made robots and domestic content in the production of advanced electronics. The job of delivering on those goals falls largely to provinces and cities across the country. As China’s third-largest municipality and an important manufacturing base, Guangzhou was destined to play a starring role in the implementation of the government’s blueprint.

Earlier this year, the city unveiled a plan that aims for trillions of yuan in revenue from information technology, artificial intelligence, biomedicine, advanced manufacturing, shipping, new energy, and other industries by 2021. City officials have traveled to Singapore, Chicago, and Silicon Valley this year to tout Guangzhou’s attractions as a business and manufacturing hub. (SD-Agencies)

 

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