-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanhan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Fun
-
Budding Writers
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Business_Markets
-
Shopping
-
Travel
-
Restaurants
-
Hotels
-
Investment
-
Yearend Review
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Sports
-
World
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
Entertainment
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen
Bhutan: Happiness is a place
    2018-January-9  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

Bhutan is a Buddhist kingdom in the foothills of the Himalayas. China’s Autonomous Region of Tibet lies to the north and west; the Indian state of Sikkim also occupies part of the western border, and the Indian states of Assam and Arunachal Pradesh lie to the south and east, respectively.

Like Nepal, it is squeezed between the first and second most populous countries in the world. Yet, with under 800,000 people, its own population is the second smallest in South Asia, after the Maldives, an archipelago to the southwest of India, with perhaps a little over half that number.

In recent decades Bhutan has been put on the map by a simple idea. In an interview in 1979, the then-king said of his country, “We do not believe in Gross National Product. Gross National Happiness is more important.”

Since then, Bhutan has been known for originating the idea that emotional well-being — happiness — trumps financial success. In fact, under that king’s son — the current king — the idea of Gross National Happiness was enshrined in the constitution of Bhutan in 2008.

Article 9, “Principles of State Policy,” says “the State shall strive to promote those conditions that will enable the pursuit of Gross National Happiness.” The government’s Gross National Happiness Commission later defined the central tenets of GNH as “sustainable and equitable socio-economic development, environmental conservation, preservation and promotion of culture and good governance.” Not a bad set of goals.

Because it has never been conquered, occupied, or governed from the outside, Bhutan does not celebrate an independence day. It did sign an agreement in 1910 to follow Britain’s lead in foreign relations and, after India’s independence, transferred that function to India in 1949, but this was a strategy to help retain independence, not give it up.

Though underdeveloped, Bhutan ranks high in economic freedom, per capita income, and ease of doing business among South Asian countries, and was considered the least corrupt in that region in 2016.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. beats, surpasses

2. low hills at the base of a mountain range

3. given a place of honor; preserved with respect

4. try hard

5. freedom from excessive effort

6. plan, way of achieving something

7. value of something before expenses etc. are deducted

8. fair, reasonable

9. principles, points of policy

10. able to be maintained or kept going

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn