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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Sports
Ticket lawsuit to be decided in Supreme Court
    2018-February-14  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

IT’S no secret that Super Bowl ticket prices in the United States can get ridiculously overpriced. But one fan in New Jersey is arguing that the National Football League (NFL) has violated the state’s Consumer Fraud Act by selling too few tickets to the general public through a lottery.

Josh Finkelman, a fan who said he overpaid for two tickets, has filed a lawsuit that will be heard by the New Jersey Supreme Court. U.S. media said Monday that Finkleman filed his lawsuit in federal court, “saying he paid US$2,000 for each ticket through a broker, though each ticket had a face value of US$800.”

Bruce Nagel, a Roseland attorney who represents Finkelman, said a 2001 New Jersey law protects consumers against inflated ticket prices by requiring vendors to sell 95 percent of their tickets directly to the general public.

In Super Bowl XLVIII in New Jersey, he said, the NFL sold only 1 percent to the public through a nationwide lottery.(SD-Agencies)

 

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