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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Shenzhen -> 
Young man making SZ’s charity cause more professional
    2018-03-09  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Zhang Qian

zhqcindy@163.com

THIS year will be significant for people devoted to philanthropy in China, as it marks almost a decade since the country’s grass-roots charity NGOs started developing rapidly after a devastating earthquake in Sichuan Province in 2008, said Luo Haiyue, a professional fund-raiser with One Foundation, China’s first nongovernmental charitable fund-raising organization.

In Futian District’s incubator for social organizations last week, Luo talked with Shenzhen Daily and shared his vision and knowledge of the development of philanthropy in Shenzhen.

Luo is the secretary of the council of the One Foundation and responsible for raising money for the NGO, which is registered and based in Shenzhen. Previously, he worked to raise funds for the Mangrove Conservation Foundation (MCF).

According to Luo, his career path has been built on his experience providing community services in the United Kingdom and establishing a student society that arranges for overseas Chinese students to come teach children in undeveloped villages in China while he was studying in England.

His goal is to be a professional charity worker in China. However, like most people who grew up in China, Luo’s initial impression of charity was just donating money.

“When natural disasters happened, schools would tell us to donate money, and my parents would tell me to donate as much as I could. I guess their encouragement gradually influenced me to always lend a hand to others,” said Luo.

At the age of 16, Luo’s understanding of charity changed when he started studying at a high school in the United Kingdom. “The first time that I learned about NGOs was when I did community service at an autism rehabilitation center in a village in England,” said Luo, adding that he would volunteer for at least three hours per week at the center.

The experience of engaging in charity in a foreign environment planted the seed in Luo’s heart. While studying for his bachelor’s degree in human geography at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), Luo gained more knowledge about social organizations.

After learning about the status quo of imbalanced education in some rural areas of China, Luo started a student society now named the Overseas Chinese Students Children’s Fund (Ofund). It expanded rapidly and is now registered in both London and Shenzhen.

Registering an NGO in China was not easy 10 years ago, when the concept of a social organization was still something new to the nation, and the registration process had rigid requirements.

However, registration was smoother in Shenzhen, a city that has been known in the country for its boldness in trying out new things and being inclusive, according to Luo.

“Shenzhen is such a special place, as many new policies and regulations are implemented here first,” said Luo. He explained that the One Foundation, detached from the Red Cross Society of China, registered its base in Shenzhen eight years ago. The city’s civil affairs bureau at that time gave immense support to the foundation, while facing great pressure.

“Over the past decade, Shenzhen’s development of nonprofit organizations, blood donation and volunteering services has been leading the country,” said Luo.

Nationwide, according to Luo, charity campaigns were mostly led by government departments before 2008. After the Sichuan earthquake, a large number of people started to think about giving back to the society or helping solve social issues.

“When people started to show willingness to do charity professionally, they began to think seriously about setting up organizations with good intentions for the public, and that’s when Chinese NGOs started to develop,” said Luo.

The boom of information technology has made it easier for social organizations to promote campaigns they are organizing. “Thanks to the Internet and e-commerce, many small organizations are able to promote their charity projects widely and gain more support,” said Luo.

The professional fund-raiser believes that the younger generation in Shenzhen has inherited their predecessors’ spirit of innovation and will help the philanthropic sector improve even more in the next decade.Luo Haiyue in his office at One Foundation, China’s first charity NGO. Zhang Qian

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Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn