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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Kaleidoscope -> 
Thai Airways’ new seatbelts have ‘waist size limit’
    2018-03-27  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

WELL, this is a little awkward.

Thai Airways has come up with a plan to install seatbelt airbags in business class cabins on its new 787 Dreamliner jets.

The move is good news for nervous flyers, but it’s bad news for those carrying some extra weight around their waists — because they simply won’t fit.

Passengers with a waistline of more than 56 inches (1.42 meters) will not be able to fasten the new seatbelt airbags in a way that meets safety standards, according to the airline, the Bangkok Post reports.

The new airbags will also make flying difficult for parents of young children, who will now be forced into cattle class if they need to travel with their kids sitting on their laps.

The seatbelts can’t be extended because of the airbag mechanism, according to the Post.

The airline has imposed a waist size limit on passengers and banned passengers carrying infants on their laps.

And it isn’t the first airline to take aim at overweight passengers.

European airline Finnair announced plans in November to weigh passengers before they boarded a plane.

The Finnish airline said it wasn’t doing it to penalize passengers for being overweight, but merely to cut down on operating costs.

By working out a more exact weight and balance of the aircraft, Finnair said it could streamline the cost of fueling its planes.

Samoa Air became the first airline in the world to charge passengers based on weight in 2013.

The airline, which has subsequently gone out of business, asked passengers for the local equivalent of 50 cents for each kilogram they were bringing on board — both on their body and in their suitcase.

(SD-Agencies)

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