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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Business -> 
China closing gap on US in tech IP race
    2018-04-17  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

CHINA’S rising investment in research and expansion of its higher education system mean that it is fast closing the gap with the United States in intellectual property (IP) and the struggle to be the No. 1 global technology power, according to patent experts.

While U.S. President Donald Trump’s threat of punitive tariffs on high-tech U.S. imports could slow China’s momentum, it won’t turn back the tide, they say.

China is already leapfrogging ahead in a couple of areas, they say.

“With the number of scientists China is training every year it will eventually catch up, regardless of what the United States does,” said David Shen, head of IP for China at global law firm Allen & Overy.

IP lawyers now see China’s pledge last week to protect foreign IP rights as projecting confidence in China’s position as a leading innovator in sectors such as telecommunications and online payments, as well as its ability to catch up in other areas.

Last year, China overtook Japan as the No. 2 patent filer in the world, with 13.4-percent annual growth, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization. If maintained, the pace will take it above the United States in just over a year.

That progress has been built on foundations which are likely to strengthen further.

China now spends 2.1 percent of its gross domestic product on research and development, not yet matching U.S. levels of 2.75 percent, but a remarkable increase from 0.7 percent in the 1990s and nearing the 2.35-percent average among members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

World Bank data shows China now produces 1,177 R&D researchers per million of its population, three times the level in the 1990s and in line with the world average. The U.S. produces many more researchers per million — at 4,321 — but that is more than offset by China’s population being about four times the size.

And the number of Chinese researchers is only going to increase.

According to United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, China now enrols more than 40 percent of its students in tertiary education, half the U.S. percentage, but a staggering rise from 0.1 percent in the 1970s.

Richard Titherington, chief investment officer for Asian emerging markets at JP Morgan Asset Management, said online payments is the clearest example where China has leapfrogged the United States, with mobile phones replacing credit cards almost entirely as a form of payment in major Chinese cities.(SD-Agencies)

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