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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World Economy -> 
Trump slams TPP again
    2018-04-19  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

U.S. President Donald Trump again soured on the 11-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) ahead of planned trade talks today with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

“While Japan and South Korea would like us to go back into TPP, I don’t like the deal for the United States,” Trump wrote. “Too many contingencies and no way to get out if it doesn’t work. Bilateral deals are far more efficient, profitable and better for our workers. Look how bad the WTO is to United States,” he said, referring to the World Trade Organization.

The original 12-member agreement, which included Japan but not South Korea, was known as the TPP. It was a signature trade policy of U.S. President Barack Obama, but he was unable to secure Congressional support for the deal.

It was thrown into limbo when Trump withdrew from the deal three days in office in January 2017, a move he said was aimed at protecting U.S. jobs.

Following the U.S. withdrawal, the remaining 11 countries renegotiated parts of the TPP, and in March, they signed the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, also known as TPP-11.

Last week, Trump directed U.S. officials to explore returning to the TPP. While his comments were welcomed by members of the trade bloc, ministers from countries including Japan, Australia and Malaysia said they opposed renegotiation of the deal to accommodate the United States should it decide to rejoin at a later date.

“We welcome the United States coming back to the table but I don’t see any wholesale appetite for any material renegotiation of the TPP-11,” Australia Trade Minister Steven Ciobo said.

Abe has been a strong proponent of the TPP. Before leaving for the talks in Florida, he told reporters in Tokyo that Japan and the United States should “take the lead on growing the economy of the Indo-Pacific through free and fair trade and investment.” (SD-Agencies)

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