-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
Imagine your Korea
    2018-05-08  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

When a country has “north,” “south,” east” or “west,” in its name, and there’s another country with a slightly different designation, it can create some confusion. So I have regularly told my students to be sure to say “South Korea,” not just “Korea.” Yet, right here, in South Korea’s tourism slogan, we see such confusion encouraged: “Imagine your Korea.”

That’s because South Korea doesn’t call itself that. It’s the Republic of Korea (ROK), and the north is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). Confusing, yes, but I suspect even a cursory inspection would clearly delineate the differences between South Korea and her neighbor to the north.

Though the North is slightly larger, South Korea’s population is more than double that of the North. Economically, the South is a modern, industrialized nation, with a generally Westernized atmosphere. For example, the capital city of Seoul and its environs is the fourth-largest metropolitan economy in the world, and over half of its 25 million residents live in high-rises.

The North? Not so much. Perhaps most telling is that the South’s GDP per capita is around US$42,000; the North’s, about US$1,800.

South Korea is located at the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula, with North Korea to the north. Eastward across the Sea of Japan is Japan; westward across the Yellow Sea is China.

Both nations speak slightly different forms of the same language. Linguists consider Korean to be a “language isolate,” one unrelated to any other living language.

Korean culture dates back to neolithic pottery finds around 8,000 B.C. By the first century B.C., three kingdoms flourished in the area. One of these, Goguryeo, or more simply Goryeo (which gives the modern nations their names), was a great power in East Asia until 668. Long-lasting dynasties ruled a unified peninsula for over a millennium, and by the 15th century Korea had one of East Asia’s highest standards of living.

There was considerable turbulence in the 20th century, including the Japanese occupation and the Korean War. The country has been split ever since.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. surrounding areas

2. something separated from all others of its type

3. New Stone Age

4. buildings with many stories

5. levels of comfort in everyday life

6. disorder, commotion

7. people who study languages

8. portray in detail, make clear

9. superficial, hasty

10. revealing, indicative

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn