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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Culture -> 
Forbidden City sets up digital gallery at Artron
    2018-05-15  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Debra Li

debra_lidan@163.com

OF the more than 1.86 million pieces of art and cultural relics in the collection of the Palace Museum in Beijing, about just 1 percent are displayed at exhibitions. To better engage and educate the public on Chinese culture, the museum has put a lot of effort into creating new digital experiences for museum-goers.

At the gallery on the fifth floor of Artron Art Center in Nanshan District, visitors will be amazed by and have fun at the exhibition “Discovering the Hall of Mental Cultivation (Yangxin Dian).”

The hall, which witnessed the life and rule of eight Qing-Dynasty (1644-1911) emperors, has been closed for conservation since December 2015. Before that, the palatial courtyard with its installations depicting the time period had been one of the most popular areas for visitors among the Forbidden City’s architecture. A cozy study in the hall is a well-known alcove and has been kept as it was, which was the place at which Emperor Qianlong kept a collection of calligraphy by Wang Xizhi, Wang Xianzhi and Wang Xun, granting the place its name the Hall of the Three Rarities (Sanxi Tang).

While the hall remains closed to the public in reality, visitors can now explore the venue, complete with its treasures, via the digital experience at Artron. In addition to architecture, the exhibition also features digital renderings of ceramics, glassware, gold and silver articles, jade, bronzes, sculpture, paintings and calligraphy. Through the interactive displays, visitors are able to learn about the creation, design, and use of the artwork in a fun and exciting way.

A wall of touch screens, called the Digital Cabinet of Curiosities (Duobao Ge), provides 360-degree photos of such treasures as a bronze jar from the early Warring States (475-221 B.C.) and a delicate blue and white porcelain vase from the Qing Dynasty. Visitors can zoom in on a piece, turn it around, or even open the lid and look inside it. They can also scan the QR code with their smartphone and save the image, complete with a one-line introduction in Chinese and English, to their phone.

Donning VIVE headgear, visitors can roam about the emperor’s residence, exploring the Hall of the Three Rarities and “converse” with “court ministers.”

In one of the AI features, visitors can chat with one of the “emperor’s old ministers,” who will give them eloquent replies in classical Chinese. Being told “I’ve gained weight,” the “old minister” would reply, “If a superior man is not ‘heavy,’ no one will respect him.” (君子不重则不威, a quote from the teachings of Confucius. The Chinese character for “heavy” also means “serious.”)

Other features include small games like preparing imperial cuisine on a touchscreen, where you can download the recipes too, and trying on imperial attire.

“It’s not just about having fun, as people have lots of things to explore,” said Feng Nai’en, vice president of the Palace Museum.

“For instance, the emperor had to put on different outfits going with different shoes and headwear for different occasions.”

By “living through” an action-packed session in the Hall of Mental Cultivation, visitors will be able to gain valuable historical understandings through interactive features and technology.

The digital exhibition, lasting until July, is a highlighted feature at Artron Art Center, a subvenue of the 14th ICIF. Other events at the venue include a pop-up book show for children, an art book show featuring the collections of Chinese museums, as well as free lectures on art, design and cultural relic preservation.

Artron, a Shenzhen-based printing house-turned-cultural company, regularly holds exhibitions and lectures at Artron Art Gallery in Futian and Artron Art Center in Nanshan. Those who want to experience the exhibitions can visit artron.com.cn to make reservations.

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Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn