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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World Economy -> 
India, EU give WTO lists of US goods for tariffs
    2018-05-21  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

INDIA and the European Union have given the World Trade Organization (WTO) lists of the U.S. products that could incur high tariffs in retaliation for U.S. President Donald Trump’s global tariffs on steel and aluminum, WTO filings showed Friday.

The EU said Trump’s steel tariffs could cost US$1.5 billion and aluminum tariffs a further US$100 million, and listed rice, cranberries, bourbon, corn, peanut butter, and steel products among the U.S. goods that it might target for retaliation.

India said it was facing additional U.S. tariffs of US$31 million on aluminum and US$134 million on steel, and listed U.S. exports of soya oil, palmolein and cashew nuts among its potential targets for retaliatory tariffs.

One trade official described the lists of retaliatory tariffs as “loading a gun,” making it plain to U.S. exporters that pain might be on the way.

India said its tariffs would come into effect by June 21, unless and until the United States removed its tariffs.

The EU said some retaliation could be applied from June 20.

Trump’s tariffs, 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum, came into force in March to strong opposition as many see the measures as unjustified and populist.

Trump justified the tariffs by claiming they were for U.S. national security, in a bid to protect them from any legal challenge at the WTO, causing further controversy.

Rather than challenging the U.S. tariffs directly, the EU and India told the United States that they regarded Trump’s tariffs as “safeguards” under the WTO rules, which means U.S. trading partners are entitled to compensation for loss of trade. The United States disagrees.

In a bid to avert a potential trade war with Washington, EU leaders agreed last week on four areas on which the bloc would be willing to open talks with the United States, but only on condition that Washington grant EU steel and aluminium makers a permanent exemption from tariffs.

The areas identified for cooperation are market access for industrial products, including cars, and government tenders, energy, notably liquefied natural gas (LNG), possible cooperation among regulators and reform of the WTO.

EU leaders sought to find a common stance, balancing the interests of those such as Germany who are most keen to avoid a trade conflict and those including France most determined not to be bullied into concessions.

“We have a common position. We want a permanent exemption and then we are ready to talk about how we can reciprocally reduce the barriers to trade,” Merkel told reporters.

EU diplomats say the need to find a unified stance goes beyond just tariffs. The United States has withdrawn from the Iran nuclear deal, posing a threat to European companies doing business there, and has blocked appointments to the World Trade Organization, undermining its ability to settle trade disputes. (SD-Agencies)

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