-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
Kazakhstan: the land of wonders
    2018-05-22  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

The Republic of Kazakhstan is the ninth-largest country in the world by area, and the largest landlocked country. Dominating Central Asia’s economy, it generates 60 percent of the region’s GDP, largely due to oil and gas production.

Part of Kazakhstan is technically located in Europe, with Russia to its northeast, north and northwest, the Caspian Sea to its southwest, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgystan to its south, and China to its southeast.

About 18 million people live there, and it has one of the world’s lowest population densities: about six people per square kilometer. Since 1997, Astana has been the capital. Previously, the country’s largest city, Almaty (meaning “place of apples,” as the fruit may have originated there) had that honor.

Like Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan has its own language, also a member of the Turkic language family. But whereas nearly 84 percent of Uzbeks speak Uzbek, only about 66 percent of Kazakhs speak Kazakh, and 21 percent speak Russian (compared to 2.3 percent in Uzbekistan).

In fact, Russian is considered an official language in Kazakhstan, partly because of its absorption into the Russian Empire in the mid-19th century. It was the last of the former Soviet republics to declare independence in 1991. The Baikonur Cosmodome — the world’s first and largest space launch facility — is located there, and is leased to the Russians (who built it) until 2050. The site is where the world’s first orbiting satellite, Sputnik, was launched in 1957, and where the cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin took off in the world’s first manned space flight in 1961.

Until the arrival of the Russians, the area had much the same history as Uzbekistan: Turkic nomads, followed by Mongol hordes, then distinct nationality. Incidentally, the name “Kazakh” is related to the Turkic word meaning “wanderer.” The English word (from Russian) “Cossack” has a similar root.

Today, about 70 percent of the people are Muslim, and 26 percent Christian. But religion is little in evidence, a holdover from Russian rule.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. something that continues from a previous time

2. device that orbits the earth

3. strictly speaking

4. Russian term for person who travels in space

5. was first found

6. gross domestic product, measure of the cash value of all goods and services produced in a time period

7. before

8. large numbers of Asian nomads

9. separate, clearly identified

10. not connected to the world’s oceans

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn